Canada Seminar

  • 2023 Feb 13

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED 

    To attend in person, please register here
    To attend the Webinar, please register here


    Unmasking Slavery's "Afterlives" Toward Safety and Flourishing across Borders: Ideological and Theological Roots of State Violence

    Johonna McCants-Turner, Associate Professor, Peace and Conflict Studies, Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo

    Challenging popular understandings of Canada as a safe haven for U.S. Americans, and specifically a space of flourishing for Black Americans, this talk will place the U.S. and Canadian origins of policing and other forms of racialized and gendered state violence in conversation with one another, drawing primarily on the writings of Black and Indigenous feminist activist-scholars in Canada. Furthermore, their voices asserting the continuities of white supremacist and heterosexist state violence will be placed in dialogue with theo-ethical analyses by U.S. womanist and Black feminist theologians in order to unmask shared theological and ethical underpinnings of racialized state violence across U.S. and Canadian contexts. Unmasking these underpinnings, and amplifying liberatory theologies and ethics, is critical to the work of expanding U.S. Canada solidarities toward liberatory approaches for safety and flourishing.  
    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2023 Mar 20

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    To attend in person, please register here

    Changing Culture

    By Carol Phillips, Partner, Moriyama & Teshima Architects

    The architect has agency in this time of interlinked crises.  It is arguable that the environmental crisis is perhaps at the root of many the intensely problematic social, social justice and health issues that continuously divide us.  While each of these requires a complexity of specific solutions and there is no simple explanation as to why we find ourselves here, what a number of these issues appear to have in common is an attitude that is evident in exploitative behaviour.  Humans have exploited the planet and each other and the damage will require both quantitative and qualitative solutions, Architecture exists at this intersection.  

    The architect has agency, and it is perhaps behaviour that we have the most agency to impact.  Through design we have a potential to change culture for those who encounter and build our buildings by creating experiences where we can see ourselves as part of nature rather than separate from it and more like each other than different. Through our work we aspire to incrementally change how we see and treat each other and the environment, and in doing so change the culture of how we live and build together.

    This talk will focus on two projects we are currently working on that have this potential.  These are The Mukwa Waakaa’igan Indigenous Centre for Cultural Excellence, a reconciliation project for Algoma University and the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association and Limberlost Place for George Brown College, a 10-storey mass timber, net-zero carbon emissions academic building in Toronto.  

  • 2023 Mar 27

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    To attend in person, please register here

    How the Indian Penal Code Came to Canada: Law, Religion, and the Global Lives of Empire

    J. Barton Scott, Associate Professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    In 1892, the Canadian government enacted a new criminal code. Driven by settler-public opinion in the years after the Northwest Métis Rebellion, this modernizing document consolidated criminal law nationally, serving as a means of consolidating Ottawa’s rule over its colonial hinterland. The new code was also part of a much larger imperial assemblage—one that spanned the world. Adapted from an 1877 English criminal code that was in turn based on the 1837 Indian Penal Code (a text with a diffusely transnational history stretching from Louisiana to Guatemala), the 1892 Canadian Criminal Code soon prompted Australia and New Zealand to create codes of their own in the mid-1890s. 

    This presentation takes this tangle of transnational connections as an occasion for asking whether settler-colonialism within Canada might be productively studied from within an interactional or contrapuntal history of empire, with particular attention to British India. By attending more closely to the global circulation of British-imperial forms of governance, might we come to a more textured understanding of settler-colonialism in North America? How did religion in particular serve as both an object and an idiom of colonial governance—simultaneously a means of marking populations and territories and of articulating projects of legal and moral subject formation?

    J. Barton Scott is Associate Professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule and Slandering the Sacred: Blasphemy Law and Religious Affect in Colonial India, both published with University of Chicago Press. 

  • 2023 Apr 24

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

    Please register here to attend this event

    The Lives of Writers


    Eleanor Wachtel, Writer and Broadcaster

    Eleanor Wachtel has earned a reputation as one of the world’s best literary interviewers during her more than 30 years as host of "Writers & Company" on CBC Radio. Five books of her interviews have been published, including Random Illuminations, a collection of reflections, correspondence and conversations with Carol Shields which won the Independent Publisher Book Award; Original Minds; and most recently, The Best of Writers & Company.  She has earned numerous accolades for her contributions to Canadian cultural life: nine honorary degrees and Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Cosponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center