Past Events

  • 2016 Apr 11

    Aeroplanes and Deportation in Britain and Canada

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262) WCFIA CGIS Knafel 1737 Cambridge Street

    CANADA PROGRAM SEMINAR

    Aeroplanes and Deportation in Britain and Canada
    WILLIAM WALTERS
    Carleton University

    There can be no expulsion without the trains, planes, buses and ships that states use to transport deportees across borders and territories. There can be no deportation without an assortment of guards, pilots, doctors, human rights observers and other experts charged with overseeing these involuntary journeys. Yet curiously the actual mechanisms of forcibly moving the deportee have been largely overlooked in studies of contemporary deportation. In this presentation I call for studies of migration, borders and deportation to bring the authorities, practices and infrastructures of transportation more fully into the research frame. I focus on one particular modality of deportation: removing people by aircraft. Drawing on examples from the Canadian and the UK experiences I map some key features of air deportation today. I argue that this mapping does more than merely fill in a missing piece of the puzzle. It also offers theoretical insight concerning two aspects of the politics of expulsion: the place of corporeality in the power relations of forced movement, and the complex play of visibility and invisibility that characterizes migration control as well as its contestation.

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  • 2016 Apr 04

    A New Canadian Foreign Policy?

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262) WCFIA CGIS Knafel 1737 Cambridge Street

    CANADA PROGRAM SEMINAR

    A New Canadian Foreign Policy?
    STEPHEN TOOPE
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Stephen J. Toope is Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. He was President and Vice-Chancellor, the University of British Columbia, from 2006-14. A former President of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, and Dean of Law, McGill University, Professor Toope also served as Law Clerk to the Rt. Hon. Brian...

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  • 2016 Mar 21

    Unsettling and Resettling Canada

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262) WCFIA CGIS Knafel 1737 Cambridge Street

    CANADA PROGRAM SEMINAR

    Unsettling and Resettling Canada
    AUDREY MACKLIN

    University of Toronto

    Canada, like the United States, is a settler society that defines itself as a country of immigration. This is not merely an empirical claim -- which would apply to innumerable states in the world today -- but also a claim that is imbued with a normative hue: Canada asserts its identity as a nation constituted through immigration, which it pursue assiduously through state policy and celebrates in the national narrative. Yet in the last decade, Canadian immigration policy began to drift away from the policies that typified settler societies over the last 150 years, and toward policy tools and discourses more typical of 'old world' European states. (This, of course, was happening even as European states were openly looking to Canada as a model). This is what I call the 'unsettling' of Canada. In recent months, the Canadian government and private citizens have mobilized to resettle tens of thousands of Syrian refugees. While the numbers are tiny as a proportion of refugees hosted by front line states, or even relative to those arriving on their own in Germany, Sweden and other EU states, they exceed the resettlement commitments made by the US, UK and France. I will argue that, apart from the practical impact of Canadian refugee resettlement, the mobilization of public and private resources for refugee resettlement signifies a moment of reclamation of a particular narrative of Canada. Engagement in refugee sponsorship can thus be understood as an act of citizenship by existing Canadians as much as a process that will produce new Canadians. This is what I call the 'resettling' of Canada.

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  • 2016 Mar 03

    Soho and the Canadian Avant-Garde: Cultural Diplomacy as a Means to Bridge the 49th Parallel

    Registration Closed 12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room 202, 61 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

    CANADA PROGRAM LUNCHTIME TALK

    Soho and the Canadian Avant-Garde: Cultural Diplomacy as a Means to Bridge the 49th Parallel
    SARAH E. K. SMITH
    Postdoctoral Fellow. Affiliated Faculty, Department of Art History and Art Conservation, and Cultural Studies Program, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.

    Chair:
    Alison Mountz, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program. Canada Research Chair of Global Migration, Balsillie School of International Affairs; Professor, Department...

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    Registration: 

  • 2016 Feb 11

    Why Geography Matters

    3:30pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Belfer Case Study Room (SO20) CGIS South Building 1730 Cambridge Street

    CANADA PROGRAM PANEL

    Why Geography Matters

    Alison Mountz, Harvard University
    Peter K. Bol, Harvard University
    Tim Cresswell, Northeastern University
    Mona Domash, Dartmouth University
    Richard Wright, Dartmough University

    Have you ever wondered why there is geospatial analysis at Harvard and yet you can’t seem to find many geography classes on campus? Have you wondered why Americans don’t study much geography? This panel will explore why geography matters, to scholarship and intellectual debates, in politics, policy-making, culture, history, humanities, and higher education. Come to learn the history of what happened to geography at Harvard, current initiatives on campus and in the discipline more broadly. Panelists will discuss why and how geography matters, now more than ever.

  • 2016 Feb 08

    Dispelling Terror in the Tamil Diaspora: The Case of Toronto

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262) WCFIA CGIS Knafel 1737 Cambridge Street

    CANADA PROGRAM SEMINAR

    Dispelling Terror in the Tamil Diaspora: the Case of Toronto
    JENNIFER HYNDMAN

    Centre for Refugee Studies, York University

    Research funded by Public Safety Canada assumes that some diasporas based in Canada 'import conflict' from their countries of origin. We take issue with the concept of 'imported conflict' in relation to diasporas, as it produces immigrant members as potential threats to Canada's security. Our research with members of the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora in Toronto traces the impact of acute violence in Sri Lanka during 2009, in particular the killing of civilians and other war crimes committed by Sri Lankan government troops and the rebel Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE, or Tamil Tigers) that left tens of thousands of Tamil civilians dead and hundreds of thousands displaced. How, if at all, were these acts of violence translated into the diaspora based in Toronto?
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