Past Events

  • 2018 Apr 12

    Canada Program Special Event - Lunch Talk

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Law School, Wasserstein 3018, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

    Reconciliation Beyond Symbolism: The Experience of Indigenous Peoples with the Criminal Justice System in Canada
    The Case of Colten Boushie

    Mr. Chris Murphy, Attorney for the Boushie Family

    With an Introduction by Gabrielle Scrimshaw (Stanford MBA ’17, Harvard MPA ’18), member of the Hatchet Lake First Nation

    Presented by the Harvard Canadian Law Students Association and the Canada Program at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and co-sponsored by the Harvard Native American Law Students Association

    Coffee Chat with Mr. Murphy at 3 p.m., in Wasserstein 3009

     

    In August, 2016, Colten Boushie, a 22-year-old Indigenous man from Red Pheasant First Nation in Saskatchewan, was shot and killed by Gerald Stanley while on Stanley's property. Stanley's trial and eventual finding of not-guilty by an all-white jury, combined with the public backlash against the verdict, underline the deep wounds that continue to obstruct reconciliation in Canada. 

    Chris Murphy, lawyer for the Boushie family, will discuss the trial, what it tells us about systemic racism in Canada and its parallels to the U.S., and the desperate need to move beyond symbolism in achieving true reconciliation. Mr. Murphy will also discuss how his experience as a victims' advocate may provide lessons for advocates seeking to engage with criminal justice movements beyond the traditional roles of prosecutor and defence counsel.

    ... Read more about Canada Program Special Event - Lunch Talk

  • 2018 Apr 02

    Canada Program Special Event

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gund Hall, Room 112 (Stubbins), 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

    Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience

    Kent Monkman, Artist

    Kent Monkman is a Canadian artist of Cree ancestry who works with a variety of mediums, including painting, film/video, performance, and installation. He has had solo exhibitions at numerous Canadian museums including the Montreal Museum of Fine Art, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and the Art Gallery of Hamilton. He has participated in various international group exhibitions including: The American West, at Compton Verney, in Warwickshire, England, Remember Humanity at Witte de With, Rotterdam, the 2010 Sydney Biennale, My Winnipeg at Maison Rouge, Paris, and Oh Canada!, MASS MOCA. Monkman has created site specific performances at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, The Royal Ontario Museum, and at Compton Verney, he has also made Super 8 versions of these performances which he calls “Colonial Art Space Interventions.” His award-winning short film and video works have been screened at various national and international festivals, including the 2007 and 2008 Berlinale, and the 2007 and 2015 Toronto International Film Festival.  Many of his media works are made with his long-time collaborator, Gisèle Gordon. His work is represented in numerous public and private collections including the National Gallery of Canada, the Denver Art Museum, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Museum London, the Glenbow Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, the Mackenzie Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Vancouver Art Gallery. He is represented by Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain in Montreal and Toronto, Trepanier Baer Gallery in Calgary and Peters Projects in Santa Fe.
     
    http://www.kentmonkman.com/

  • 2018 Mar 30

    Canada Program Special Event

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, Harvard Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

    Centering the Voices of Indigenous Women: Self-Determination and Decolonization through Literature, Scholarship, and Action

    In Conversation with Dr. Kim Tallbear, Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta, Erica Violet Lee, Indigenous Rights Activist with the Idle No More movement, and Emily Riddle, Policy Analyst and Writer, Tween Vogue

    Moderated by: Dr. Adrienne Keene, Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

    Cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and the Harvard Graduate School of Design

  • 2018 Mar 30

    Canada Program Special Event

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Faculty Club, Reading Room (first floor), 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

    Can Nationalism Help Immigrants? The Limits of Rights Claims-making on Behalf of Noncitizens

    Irene Bloemraad, Professor of Sociology, Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies and Faculty Director, Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative, University of California, Berkeley

    How can one advocate effectively on behalf of noncitizens? Contemporary populism, whether in Hungary, the United Kingdom or the United States, appears to pit appeals to national values against the entry or inclusion of immigrants. In response, immigration advocates frequently call on rights language. Some appeal to human rights, contending that no human is illegal. Others, especially in the United States, call on the history and resonance of civil rights. But are these competing frames persuasive? This talk draws on survey experiment data to examine whether frames couched in the language of civil rights, human rights, or national values affect support for undocumented immigrants and citizens in need. Overall, respondents are much less supportive of government action for undocumented immigrants than citizens. Rights-based appeals do not mitigate this categorical inequality based on legal status. Indeed, among California voters, the civil rights frame might decreases respondents' support for government action, for citizens and noncitizens alike. Perhaps surprisingly, appeals to national values appear, in some cases, to make people more generous and willing to be inclusive, even to undocumented or irregular migrants. There is suggestive, preliminary evidence that these findings are not unique to the United States, but also hold in Norway and likely also in Canada. Understanding the possibilities of inclusive nationalism is an urgent challenge in a world where some political leaders are linking national values with closed borders and exclusionary membership.

    ... Read more about Canada Program Special Event

  • 2018 Mar 26

    Canada Seminar

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    A Pivot Toward Justice and Inclusion

    David Shelton, Battalion Chief, City of Montreal Fire Department

    David Shelton 
    is a 29-year veteran of the fire service. He presently holds the rank of Battalion Chief for the City of Montreal Fire Departement (Le Service de Sécurité Incendie de Montréal (SIM)). He oversees fire operations for seven of the city’s 67 stations. He also oversees the Departments efforts to increase Inclusion and Diversity. Chief Shelton started his career in 1988 as a firefighter in his native city of Detroit Michigan, where he was recognized for top academic achievement in his class. He was a member of the Black Firefighters association known as the Phoenix organization as well as the Concerned Professional Firefighters of Detroit, a club organized around continuing education and professional development. For a number of personal and professional reasons he left the Detroit Fire Department to pursue his career in Montreal. Hired in May of 1992 he became the first professional firefighter of African descent to be hired in the province of Quebec. He was recognized by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a Local Hero in 1994 for his community involvement and he was featured as a Black History Month Laureate by the Montreal Black History Month Roundtable. He has served in the fire department in numerous capacities including driver, instructor, Lieutenant and Capitaine before earning the rank of Battalion Chief in 2016. He has worked throughout his career to address issues around gender and race in the fire service and in society.

    Other past and present organizational affiliations include: NAACP, National Urban League, Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, NDG Black Community Association, Youth In Motion and HeForShe.

  • 2018 Mar 19

    Canada Seminar

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Bureaucrats and Immigration Policymaking: The Case of Quebec, Canada

    Mireille Paquet, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

    Mireille Paquet is the William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow of the Canada Program at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and an assistant professor of political science at Concordia University. She co-directs Concordia’s Centre for Immigration Policy Evaluation (CIPE) and is a 2016-2017 Concordia University research fellow. She conducts research on immigration politics, with a focus on settler societies, public administration and federalism. Her work has been featured in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, the Canadian Journal of Political Science, Politique et Sociétés and Policy & Society. Her first book, La fédéralisation de l’immigration au Canada (PUM, 2016), is forthcoming in English at the University of Toronto Press.

  • 2018 Mar 05

    Canada Program Special Event

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Wasserstein Hall, Room Milstein East C (second floor), Harvard University Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue

    Keynote Lunch Address 

    Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

    In cosponsorship with the Women's Law Association, Harvard University Law School

  • 2017 Nov 27

    Canada Seminar

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood

    Anique Jordan, Artist, Writer, Scholar
    Andrew Hunter, Senior Curator, Art Gallery of Guelph

    Canadian curators Anique Jordan and Andrew Hunter will present an illustrated lecture based on their recent exhibition and publication Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood, a critical reflection on Canada’s current sesquicentennial year (1867-2017) currently at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto through December 11th. Featuring over 35 contemporary artist’s projects, this exhibition has been praised for considering Canada  “from its brutal colonial origins right on up to the present day, much of it not meriting the rising jingoism of the sesquicentennial moment. It extends to an indictment for the institution itself,” (The Toronto Star) and for “incorporating diversity, social justice advocacy and community outreach in a riveting presentation that will be referenced and discussed for years to come.” (Canadian Art).  Speaking together, Jordan and Hunter will discuss key curatorial concepts, artworks and programming, and will also reflect on their respective creative paths since organizing what has been widely considered to be the “Canada 150 Exhibition We Need.” (shedoesthecity.com)

     

    Anique Jordan is a self-taught, award-winning artist, writer and scholar of Afro-Caribbean decent. Her artwork plays with the aesthetics found in traditional Trinidadian carnival and the theory of hauntology challenging historical narratives and creating, what she calls, impossible images. Her practice works across photography, performance and installation. With over a decade working at the cross roads of cultural projection and community economic development, she has performed and exhibited in galleries across North America and the Caribbean. Currently Anique is a core documenter with Black Lives Matter Toronto, the 2017 Toronto Arts Foundation Emerging Artist of the Year, a curator at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the executive director of Whippersnapper Gallery.

    Andrew Hunter is an accomplished curator, artist, writer, educator and community researcher. He recently became the Senior Curator at the Art Gallery of Guelph. From 2013 to 2017 he was the Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art, at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Hunter has held curatorial positions across Canada and, as an independent artist and curator he has produced exhibitions and publications in Canada, the United States, England, China and Croatia. A graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Hunter is known for his innovative narrative-based museum interventions and his ongoing creative research performance Professor William Starling’s Perambulations of Inquiry. With Lisa Hirmer, he founded the international creative research project DodoLab and has been Adjunct Faculty at the Ontario College of Art and Design University and at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture. Hunter’s curatorial work emphasizes inter-disciplinarity, collaboration and narrative and he is committed to the museum as a truly publically engaged institution of community learning and progressive thought. 

    Hunter has curated and co-curated a number of significant Canadian exhibitions including: The Other Landscape (Art Gallery of Alberta), Tom Thomson (AGO and NGC, with Dennis Reid and Charles Hill), Emily Carr: New Perspectives (a multi-curator collaboration with the NGC and VAG), Carl Schaefer (Museum London), and To A Watery Grave and Dark Matter: The Great War and Fading Memory (Confederation Centre). Hunter was Adjunct Curator at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection and his work for the institution included Ding Ho/Group of Seven (with Xiong Gu). His major AGO exhibitions included Alex Colville and The Idea of North: The Paintings of Lawren Harris (with Steve Martin and Cynthia Burlingham) and he lead the expanded version of this exhibition in Toronto accompanied by his book In The Ward. He co-curated the current exhibition Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood (with Anique Jordan), a critical reflection on the Canada 150 moment featuring over 40 contemporary artists.... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2017 Nov 13

    Canada Program Special Event

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Memorial Church, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

    Writers Speak Series
    A Reading from Selected Works
    Michael Ondaatje, Author

    In Conversation with Claire Messud, Author and Senior Lecturer, Department of English, Harvard University 

    Michael Ondaatje is the author of five novels, a memoir, a nonfiction book on film, and several books of poetry. His novel The English Patient won the Man Booker Prize, and his fourth novel, Anil’s Ghost, won the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, the Giller Prize, and the Prix Médicis. Born in Sri Lanka, Ondaatje now lives in Toronto.
    Claire Messud is Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing in the English Department at Harvard and author of numerous novels, most recently The Burning Girl (2017).

    Conveners
    Homi Bhabha

    Director, Mahindra Humanities Center; Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities, Department of English, Harvard University

    Tim Colton
    Chair, Canada Program Steering Committee; Morris and Anna Feldberg Professor of Russian Studies, Department of Government, Harvard University


    Cosponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center

  • 2017 Nov 03

    Canada Program Special Event

    11:30am to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Meeting Room (2nd floor), 61 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

    “For this They Fight”: Canadians in the Spanish Civil War

    Michael Petrou, the 2018 Martin Wise Goodman Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

    More than 1,600 Canadians volunteered to fight for the Spanish Republic during Spain’s civil war of 1936-1939 — more, per capita, than volunteered from almost any other country. Yet Spain was an ocean away from Canada, and virtually none of the Canadian volunteers had any obvious ties to Spain. Why, then, did so many choose to fight there?
    A longtime foreign correspondent, Petrou has reported from across the Middle East, Europe, and Central Asia. He has a doctorate in modern history from Saint Antony’s College, University of Oxford, and is the author of Renegades: Canadians in the Spanish Civil War.

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