Past Events

  • 2019 Mar 25

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Indigenous Peoples' Issues in Canada in 2019"

    Speaker: Mariame Aboubakrine, Chair, United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University 

    Lunch will be provided if you register by clicking the sign up link below.

    Dr. Aboubakrine is a medical doctor and a member of Tin-Hinan, a women’s association working for the defence, promotion of Indigenous peoples's rights in Sahel-Sahara region including the right to a sustainable development, particularly the Tuareg. She is also an independent consultant on gender issues, education,health, and conflict resolution/peace agreement in Indigenous communities.Dr Aboubakrine is an international speaker and author of articles on issues as diverse as the right to health,culture or Indigenous languages.
    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

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  • 2019 Mar 11

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Moving Left or Right? Racial Politics and Battles over Urban Policy in Canada"

    Speaker: Anne-Marie Livingstone, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University 

    Lunch will be provided if you register by clicking the sign up link below.

    In the scholarship on public policy, one central preoccupation has been understanding why governments across national and regional contexts often resort to dramatically dissimilar policies, despite the similarities in the problems they are attempting to solve. Typically, scholars find that the character of the state’s institutions bears the greatest influence on the trajectory of policy. However, the same political institutions can behave quite differently depending on the issues at stake. The presentation describes findings from a comparative study of two Canadian provinces, Quebec and Ontario, that devised opposing solutions to similar crises of urban violence in 2005, at the height of moral panics over delinquency in which racial stereotypes of black youth were embodied as threats to public safety. Contrary to its reputation for progressive social policy, Quebec embraced a disciplinary strategy of fighting “street gangs”; in Ontario, in contrast, where neo-liberalism had taken root, policy-makers voted to break with the trend of austerity and expand social provision for young people. The reasons for these discrepancies lie in the fundamentally contrasting racial politics of the two provinces. In Quebec, the institutions of sub-state nationalism, corporatism, and centralization have laid the foundation for its larger welfare state, yet they have also suppressed and de-politicized issues of racial inequality. As a result, the Montreal police department was able to push through a law-and-order agenda on “street gangs” unimpeded and insulated from public debate. In Ontario, the history of multiculturalism, decentralization, and anti-racism organizing in Toronto created openings for black politicians and black advocacy organizations to intervene in the policy-making in 2005 and persuade authorities to embrace a race-conscious policy, one focusing on poverty, racial discrimination, and gaps in social services. Findings illustrate that the participation of racial minority actors in the policy process can move race-conscious policy forward in Canada, even when the political winds would predict contraction rather than progress in policy.

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar
  • 2019 Feb 25

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Ethiopia's Dawn: Messianic Black Nationalism in Inter-War North America"

    Speaker: Wendell Nii Laryea Adjetey, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, WCFIA Canada Program, and Lecturer, Department of History, Harvard University

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University

    Lunch will be provided if you register by clicking the sign up link below.

    Wendell Nii Laryea Adjetey is a historian of the twentieth-century United States who studies the historical intersections of the United States, Canada, and the African Diaspora. Adjetey's manuscript, Cross-Border Cosmopolitans: The Making of a Pan-African North America, 1919-1992, is under review for publication. He earned the Ph.D., M.Phil., and M.A. at Yale University in History and African American Studies.

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

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  • 2019 Jan 28

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed12:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Teaching and Practicing Indigenous Law: Canada's New Indigenous Law Degree"

    Speaker: John Borrows, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria Law School, British Columbia

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University 

    Lunch will be provided if you register by clicking the sign up link below.

    John Borrows B.A., M.A., J.D., LL.M. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Osgoode Hall Law School), LL.D. (Hons., Dalhousie, York & Law Society of Upper Canada) F.R.S.C., is the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria Law School in British Columbia. His publications include, Recovering Canada; The Resurgence of Indigenous Law (Donald Smiley Award for the best book in Canadian Political Science, 2002), Canada's Indigenous Constitution (Canadian Law and Society Best Book Award 2011), Drawing Out Law: A Spirit's Guide (2010), Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism ((Donald Smiley Award for the best book in Canadian Political Science, 2016), The Right Relationship (with Michael Coyle, ed.), all from the University of Toronto Press. He is the 2017 Killam Prize winner in Social Sciences. John is Anishinaabe/Ojibway and a member of the Chippewa of the Nawash First Nation in Ontario, Canada.

    Registration: 

  • 2018 Nov 05

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:05pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie Vernon Room (room K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA


    #OurWaterOurFood: Environmental justice and Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada's Arctic Offshore
    Noor Johnson 

    Noor Johnson is a cultural anthropologist whose research focuses on the politics and practices of environmental knowledge in the Arctic. Her work has examined movements for Indigenous sovereignty through activism and bureaucratic governance. She holds a Research Scientist appointment with National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Boulder, where she works on projects related to food sovereignty, community-based monitoring, and Indigenous data management. She is also affiliated with the Center for Science Diplomacy at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. From 2015 – 2016, she was an inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative Scholar researching offshore development and renewable energy. In addition to her academic research, Noor has served as a science policy and strategy advisor to non-profit and Indigenous organizations, including the National Geographic Society, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Inuit Circumpolar Council.

    A light lunch will be served. Please register for this event.

    Registration: 

  • 2018 Oct 29

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:05pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie Vernon Room (room K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    Tropes, Treaties and Trials: Indigenous Peoples and Access to Justice in Canada
    L. Jane McMillan

    L. Jane McMillan is the former Canada Research Chair for Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Communities (2006-2016), and current Chair and Associate Professor of the department of Anthropology at St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia. Jane holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia. She is a cultural and legal anthropologist with a specialization in Indigenous justice and applied research methodologies. Jane has worked with Mi’kmaw communities throughout Atlantic Canada for over 20 years, conducting ethnographic research, policy analyses, advocating for Indigenous and treaty rights and the revitalization of Indigenous legal systems. She is a former eel fisher and one of the original defendants in the Supreme Court of Canada Marshall decision (1999), which resulted in renewed recognition of treaty and Aboriginal rights and transformed Indigenous access to commercial fisheries. Jane served as President of the Canadian Law and Society Association, and is currently the coordinator of the Law and Indigeneity Collaborative Research Network of the American Law and Society Association, and a member of the Mi’kmaq / Nova Scotia / Canada Tripartite Forum Justice Committee. Her most recent publication Truth and Conviction: Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaw Quest for Justice (UBC Press, 2018) is available in November.

    A light lunch will be served. Please register for this event.

    Registration: 

  • 2018 Oct 15

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:05pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    61 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, MA


    Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’ Transnational Challenge to International Labor Law
    Adelle Blackett
     

    Adelle Blackett is Professor of Law and Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development at the Faculty of Law, McGill University. Professor Blackett holds a B.A. in History from Queen’s University, civil law and common law degrees from McGill, and an LL.M. and a doctorate in law from Columbia University. A former official of the International Labour Office in Geneva, Professor Blackett has been an ILO expert on international standard setting on decent work for domestic workers (2008-2011) leading to the adoption of ILO Convention No. 189 and Recommendation No. 201, and in a labour law reform process in Haiti (2011-2014). In 2009, she was unanimously appointed by the National Assembly of Quebec to the province’s Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission, where she served as a commissioner for seven (7) years. Professor Blackett is a 2016 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow and has been a visiting scholar at the African Development Bank, the Australian National University, and SOAS (University of London). She founded and directs the Labour Law and Development Research Laboratory (LLDRL) at McGill. A member of the Law Society of Upper Canada and the Barreau du Québec, she was awarded the latter’s Christine Tourigny Award of Merit and the status of advocate emeritus in 2014, in recognition of her social commitment and her contributions to the advancement of women. Her book manuscript entitled Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’ Transnational Challenge to International Labor Law is forthcoming in Spring 2019 from Cornell University Press.

    A light lunch will be served. Please register for this event.

    Registration: 

  • 2018 Oct 01

    Canada Seminar

    12:05pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Room WCC109, Wasserstein Hall (corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Everett Street), Harvard Law School


    Impact Litigation for Youth and Indigenous Rights
    Cindy Blackstock

    Cindy Blackstock is a Canadian-born Indigenous activist for for child welfare. She and her organization, the Caring Society, successfully sued the Canadian government for discriminating against Indigenous children, winning their human rights complaint. This talk will touch on Indigenous issues in North America, impact litigation, and advocacy for youth and children.
    Cosponsored by the Harvard Canadian Law Students Association

  • 2018 Sep 24

    Dawnland: Documentary Screening and Discussion

    5:30pm to 7:00pm

    Location: 

    Knafel Building, Radcliffe Yard, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

    Dawnland: Documentary Screening and Discussion 
    For much of the 20th century, child welfare authorities removed Native American children from their tribal homes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. The feature-length documentary Dawnland chronicles the first official truth and reconciliation commission in the United States for Native Americans and explores the possibilities of healing and reconciliation. A panel conversation and Q&A session will follow the screening.

    Please register for this event:
    https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/2018_dawnland_screening

    Speakers:
    Esther Anne, codirector, Maine-Wabanaki REACH
    Adam Mazo, codirector, Dawnland; director, Upstander Project
    Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Chair of Canadian studies, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, faculty of law, and professor, department of anthropology, McGill University
    Moderated by Robert Anderson, Oneida Indian Nation visiting professor, Harvard Law School; Charles I. Stone Professor of Law, and director, Native American Law Center, University of Washington School of Law

    The Knafel Center will open at 5 PM for a light reception beforehand.
     
    For additional event information, visit:
    www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-dawnland-screening.
    Cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Program on Negotiation at the Harvard Law School

    ... Read more about Dawnland: Documentary Screening and Discussion

  • 2018 Apr 23

    Canada Seminar

    4:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    The Road to Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples in Canada

    Madame Justice Cynthia Petersen

    Madam Justice Cynthia Petersen is a judge of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Brampton, Ontario.  Prior to her appointment to the judiciary in June 2017, she was a lawyer in private practice for 22 years in Toronto.  During her years in practice, she represented numerous LGBT clients and community organizations in many ground-breaking court cases involving LGBT equality rights in Canada.   She was one of the lead counsel involved in the successful litigation for marriage equality for same-sex couples in Canada.  Prior to practising law, she was a professor of law at the University of Ottawa.

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