Past Events

  • 2019 Oct 28

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Canada's Federal Election Roundtable

    Edana Beauvais, Visiting Democracy Fellow at HKS's Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation

    David Eaves, Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University

    Veronica Kitchen, Associate Professor, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Karyn Pugliese, Nieman Fellow, Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Journalism, Ryerson University

    Christopher Sands, Senior Research Professor & Director of the Center for Canadian Studies; Johns Hopkins University

    Benjamin Zyla, Associate Professor, School of International Development & Global Studies, University of Ottawa and Visiting Scholar, Department of Government, Harvard University

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2019 Oct 21

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Why Immigration is a Solution, Not a Problem in Atlantic Canada: Beyond Us, Them, and Other

    Howard Ramos, Professor, Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University
    and
    Yoko Yoshida, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University

    While the rest of the world is shaped by tensions between dominant populations and migrant minorities, seeing immigration as a problem, Canada has largely seen diversity and multiculturalism as its strength and in turn immigration as a solution to its problems. This is what sparked the “us, them, others” model to grapple with how English Canada, Quebecers and immigrants navigate multiculturalism, diversity, and inclusion. The model primarily focuses on trends in central Canadian politics through the lens of those in Ontario and Quebec overlooking the regional differences that shape inter group dynamics in the rest of Canada. 

     

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2019 Oct 07

    Special Event

    12:15pm to 3:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Immigration and Citizenship Policies in Canada and France: a “Civic Turn”?


    Respect for the “Values of the Republic” as a Prerequisite for Immigrant Integration in France

    Myriam Hachimi Alaoui
    , Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Le Havre Normandie, IDEES-Le Havre (UMR 6266 IDEES – CNRS), French Collaborative Institute on Migration (CI Migration)
    Janie Pélabay, FNSP Research Fellow at Sciences Po, Centre for Political Research (CEVIPOF), CNRS (UMR 7048)

    The Dark Side of Canada’s Naturalization Regime: Failing the Most Vulnerable?

    Delphine Nakache, Associate Professor of Law, University of Ottawa
    Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University, and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

    Chair: Yossi Harpaz, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Tel-Aviv University

    Discussant: Saskia BonjourSenior Lecturer in Political Science, University of Amsterdam

    Workshop co-sponsored by the Fonds France-Canada pour la Recherche, Ministère de lʼEnseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de lʼInnovation, République française
    ... Read more about Special Event

  • 2019 Sep 23

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Beyond Multiculturalism and Secularism: A Relational Approach to Diversity and Inclusion

    Dr. Pascale Fournier, President and CEO of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation.

    Dr. Pascale Fournier holds a Doctor in Law from Harvard University, she is a prolific and bilingual author. Dr. Fournier’s academic contributions reflect key themes promoted by the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, including Human Rights and Dignity, Canada and the World, and Responsible Citizenship. Prior to her appointment as head of the Foundation, Dr. Fournier was Research Chair in Legal Pluralism and Comparative Law at the University of Ottawa where she taught Human Rights, Critical Approaches to Law and Family Law as a Full professor.

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2019 Sep 13

    Special Event

    9:00am to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    Robinson Hall, Basement Seminar Room

    Mobilities & Immobilities: Histories of Modern Migration to and in the Americas

    Questions of migration are being debated across the globe with alarming urgency. Yet, contemporary forms of migration and the debates that arise from them are underscored by historical processes often rooted in concerns related to race, gender, sexuality, labor, class, and the state. This workshop will pull together scholars committed to the study of migration to and in the Americas during the modern period. Our aim is to bring together a small group of scholars whose historical engagement with migration studies can speak across histories of migration often bracketed into smaller subfields and Area Studies. In this regard, we hope to facilitate a larger conversation that underscores the various historical concerns that have produced mobility for some and immobility for others, and, at times, sustained shifting relations between mobility and immobility.

    For more details on this event, please visit: Mobilities and Immobilities: Histories of Modern Migration to and in the Americas

    Workshop sponsored by the Asia Center and cosponsored by the Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

  • 2019 Sep 12

    Special Event

    9:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    William James Hall, Room 1550, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

    Mobilities & Immobilities: Histories of Modern Migration to and in the Americas

    Questions of migration are being debated across the globe with alarming urgency. Yet, contemporary forms of migration and the debates that arise from them are underscored by historical processes often rooted in concerns related to race, gender, sexuality, labor, class, and the state. This workshop will pull together scholars committed to the study of migration to and in the Americas during the modern period. Our aim is to bring together a small group of scholars whose historical engagement with migration studies can speak across histories of migration often bracketed into smaller subfields and Area Studies. In this regard, we hope to facilitate a larger conversation that underscores the various historical concerns that have produced mobility for some and immobility for others, and, at times, sustained shifting relations between mobility and immobility.

    For more details on this event, please visit: Mobilities and Immobilities: Histories of Modern Migration to and in the Americas

    Workshop sponsored by the Asia Center, and cosponsored by the Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

  • 2019 Sep 11

    Special Event

    4:15pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Across Oceans of Law

    Renisa Mawani, Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Law and Society Program, University of British Columbia

    Chaired by Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

    Abstract: In 1914, the S.S. Komagata Maru left Hong Kong for Vancouver carrying 376 Punjabi migrants. Chartered by railway contractor Gurdit Singh, the ship and its passengers were denied entry into Canada and eventually deported to Calcutta. In Across Oceans of Law Renisa Mawani retells this well-known story of the Komagata Maru, drawing on what she terms “oceans as method”—a mode of thinking and writing that repositions land and sea.

    For more details on this event, please visit: Across Oceans of Law

    Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center
    Cosponsored by the Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and by the Committee on Ethnicity, Migration Rights

  • 2019 Apr 12

    Canada Seminar

    2:00pm to 4:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie Vernon Room (room K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA


    "A Pluralist City in a Populist World"

    Naheed Nenshi, Mayor of Calgary, Alberta

    Naheed Nenshi, A’paistootsiipsii, was sworn in as Calgary's 36th mayor on October 25, 2010 and was re-elected in 2013 and 2017. Prior to being elected, Mayor Nenshi was with McKinsey and Company, later forming his own business to help public, private and non-profit organizations grow. He designed policy for the Government of Alberta, helped create a Canadian strategy for The Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy, and worked with the United Nations to determine how business can help the poorest people on the planet. He then entered academia, where he was Canada's first tenured professor in the field of nonprofit management, at Mount Royal University's Bissett School of Business. For his work, Mayor Nenshi was named a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum, was awarded the President’s Award from the Canadian Institute of Planners, and received the Humanitarian Award from the Canadian Psychological Association for his contributions to community mental health. In 2013, after his stewardship of the community during devastating flooding, Maclean’s magazine called him the second-most influential person in Canada, after the Prime Minister. He was also awarded the 2014 World Mayor Prize by the UK-based City Mayor’s Foundation as the best mayor in the world. In 2014, he was also honoured by Elder Pete Standing Alone with the Blackfoot name A’paistootsiipsii, which means "Clan Leader" or "He who moves camp and the others follow". In 2016, Elder Bruce Starlight of the Tsuu T'ina First Nation honoured him with the name Iitiya: "Always Ready". Mayor Nenshi holds a Bachelor of Commerce (with distinction) from the University of Calgary, where he was President of the Students' Union, and a Master in Public Policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where he studied as a Kennedy Fellow. 

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

  • 2019 Apr 08

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Muskrat Falls and Standing Rock: Infrastructure Projects on Indigenous Lands in Canada and the US"

    Speaker: Colin Samson, Professor of Sociology, University of Essex, UK

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University 

    Lunch will be provided if you register by clicking the sign up link below.

    Colin Samson is a sociologist based at the University of Essex. He has worked with the Innu peoples of the Labrador-Quebec peninsula since 1994. His book A Way of Life that Does Not Exist: Canada and the Extinguishment of the Innu (2003) won the Pierre Savard Award. He is also author of A World You Do Not Know: Settler Societies, Indigenous Peoples and the Attack on Cultural Diversity (2013) and with Carlos Gigoux, Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism: A Global Perspective (2017).  Colin collaborated with filmmaker Sarah Sandring on the films ‘Nutshimit’ (2010) and ‘Nutak’ (2013) about the recent and historical experiences of the Mushuau Innu. He is currently completing a book entitled Colonialism and Universal Human Rights: The Ongoing Hypocrisies of Western Societies.

    ... Read more about Canada Seminar

    Registration: 

  • 2019 Apr 01

    Canada Seminar

    Registration Closed 12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

    "Prime Time Policing: Seeing Justice Through Canadian Crime Dramas"

    Speaker: Sarah Britto, Professor, Department of Justice Studies, University of Regina

    Chair: Ronald Niezen, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies and Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill University

    Sarah Britto is a Professor in the Department of Justice Studies at the University of Regina.  She received her Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Florida State University and has previously been a faculty member at Georgia State University, Central Washington University, and Prairie View A&M University.  Much of her research focuses on media portrayals of victims, offenders, and criminal justice professionals and how these portrayals shape crime-related public perceptions, such as attitudes toward the police, fear of crime, and punitive attitudes.  In addition to media research, she has also published a number of studies on homicide and co-authored the book In the Shadow of Death: Restorative Justice and Death Row Families

    Please sign up for this event, using the link below.

    Registration: 

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