Past Events

  • 2020 Mar 31

    Canada Program Special Event

    3:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    National Populism and Polarization in the US, Canada, and Europe Since 2014

    Eric Kaufmann, Professor of Politics, Birkbeck College, University of London

    There has been a surge of national populism in the West since 2014. Along with this has come an increasingly polarized cultural and political climate. I argue that the backdrop to this shift is the decline of ethnic majorities in western countries. Immigration is the critical issue, not necessarily due to its effects, but because it is a symbol of ethnic change. Cultural progressivism is also a critical part of the story. The post-1960s power of this ideology has partially contributed to unprecedented demographic shifts, and is interacting with ethnic change in important ways. The power of ideas of diversity and cultural equalitarianism in elite institutions is both a cause of populist backlash and a force reacting against the rise of populism. National populism in turn responds to progressivism, in dialectical fashion. The result is a realignment of politics from the material cleavages of the twentieth century to a more cultural axis. This is accompanied by growing polarization, especially over immigration. This is as true of English Canada, where populism is ostensibly weaker, as it is of the United States, Europe and Australasia.

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  • 2020 Mar 30

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    National Boundaries and the Dehumanization and Rehumanization of Refugees

    Victoria Esses, Professor of Psychology, University of Western Ontario

    Victoria Esses is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Network for Economic and Social Trends and of the Centre for Research on Migration and Ethnic Relations at the University of Western Ontario. She is also Principal Investigator of the Pathways to Prosperity Partnership, a national alliance of university, community and government partners dedicated to fostering welcoming communities and promoting the integration of immigrants in Canada. Victoria is a Fellow of the CIFAR program, Boundaries, Membership and Belonging. Victoria’s research focuses on immigration policy and practice, including public attitudes toward immigration and cultural diversity; promising practices in settlement and integration; factors promoting the settlement and integration of immigrants; and the measurement of community welcome-ability and immigrant needs and outcomes. She has published extensively in these areas, including journal articles, book chapters, and edited volumes. Victoria is regularly consulted by federal, provincial, and municipal governments on immigration issues, and her research has had a major impact on immigration policy and practice in Canada and internationally. She has also served as an Expert Consultant for the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) on several occasions.
     

     

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  • 2020 Feb 24

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Struggle to Belong: Immigration Policies and Experiences of Temporariness in Canada

    Danièle Bélanger, Professor of Geography and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration Processes, Laval University
     
    Danièle Bélanger is Professor of Geography and holder of the Senior Canada Research Chair in Global Migration Processes at the Université Laval in Québec City (Canada). Her research examines the repercussions of migration policies on migrants’ trajectories and experiences in various parts of the world; her projects particularly pay attention to temporary migrant workers, undocumented migrants, asylum seekers, refugees, marriage and other family migrants. She conducts research projects on refugee migration in the Americas (Central Americans in Mexico) and the Middle East (Syrians in Turkey). On Mexico, she is the co-author of the book Rethinking Transit Migration. Precarity, Mobility and Self-Making in Mexico (2015, Palgrave). Research results on Turkey were recently published in Mediterranean Politics (2018), Patterns of Prejudice (2019) and in the Handbook of Migration Crises (Oxford, 2019). Her migration research on Asia was published in The Annals of Social and Political Science, Current Sociology, Asian Population Studies, Asia Pacific Migration Journal and Pacific Affairs. She is the co-editor of three edited books on Vietnam published by Springer, Stanford University Press, and in the Southeast Asian Series of Cornell University.


  • 2020 Feb 10

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Does Racial Justice and Reconciliation Require Moving Beyond the Problem of Whiteness?


    Rima Wilkes, Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

    Is the struggle against racism a struggle against white supremacy? In both the academy and beyond, there is much discussion of the problem of whiteness and white supremacy. In this talk, I begin by using my own story and my own positionality as a basis for interrogating what has now become dominant thinking, particularly on the left, about the meaning of whiteness. Several literatures including the settler colonial, racial capitalism, critical race and critical ethnic studies literatures all center a struggle against whiteness, white privilege, white fragility and white supremacy. The binary and message about who are the “bad guys” is clear. In contrast, here I propose an alternative non-binary approach to thinking about racial justice and reconciliation that still centers the experience of racial oppression but that does not also entail blaming a particular group as oppressor. While I focus on Canada and responsibility for Indigenous genocide (and, to some extent, anti-Blackness) my hope is that the larger theoretical logic will also be of utility for thinking about moving forward on issues of racial justice and genocide in the contemporary United States of America. 


    Rima Wilkes is Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her work has appeared in a variety of journals including International Migration Review, American Sociological Review, Science and Social Forces. She is the Past President of the Canadian Sociological Association, a past editor of the Canadian Review of Sociology and in 2017 received the UBC Killam Research Award. Her current project interrogates the oppressed/oppressor binaries that persist in the study of race and racism.  

  • 2020 Feb 03

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie Vernon Room (room K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA


    Non-Conventional Capitalism: Fracking, the Tar Sands Industry, and Peak Oil
     

    Troy Vettese, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

    Troy Vettese is an environmental historian, and graduate of New York University, where he studied neo-liberal environmental thought. He is currently turning his dissertation into a book entitled Beyond Externality, and is working on a second book for Verso with Drew Pendergrass (Harvard) on central planning and the environmental crisis. 

  • 2019 Dec 03

    Canada Program Special Event - Workshop

    9:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    WORKSHOP

    Pluralism in a Historical Context: Challenges and Opportunities in North America

    Speakers:

    Pluralism's Imperialism: Legality Difference on Turtle Island
    Aaron Mills, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Constitutionalism and Philosophy McGill University

    African Americans and Racial Incorporation: Preindustrial Urban Roots
    Joe Trotter, Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice, History Department, Carnegie Mellon University

    “He Couldn’t Have A Life:” State...

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  • 2019 Dec 02

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Multiculturalism vs Interculturalism: Municipal Governance and Double Binds in the Era of Super-Diversity

    Bob White, Associate Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Montreal

    Bob W. White is professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Laboratory for Research on Intercultural Relations (LABRRI) at the University of Montréal. He is a member of several international research networks and has served as visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, at the University of Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar and the Max Planck Institute in Gottingen. He has published extensively on popular culture, cultural policy and globalization, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. His current research focuses on intercultural practice and policy in increasingly diverse urban settings. In 2012 he created a multi-sectoral research partnership on intercultural dynamics in Montréal (“Montréal Ville Interculturelle’, SSHRC, 2012-2020) and since 2016 he is the coordinator of the Réseau des municipalités en immigration et relations interculturelles du Québec (RÉMIRI). In 2014 he published (with Lomomba Emongo) the first edited volume on the history of intercultural practice and policy in Québec (L’interculturel au Québec : rencontres historiques et enjeux politiques, Montréal: PUM). His most recent book is titled Intercultural Cities : Policy and Practice for a New Era (London : Palgrave McMillan) and he is currently working on a critical theory of intercultural communication.

     

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  • 2019 Nov 18

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Elimi(Nation): Canada’s “Post-Settler” Embrace of Disposable Migrant Labour

    Daiva Stasiulis, Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University

    Daiva Stasiulis is Professor of Sociology at Carleton University. She has published extensively on issues of citizenship and non-citizenship, race, migration, intersectional feminism and diversity.  In 2007, with co-author A. Bakan, she was awarded the 2007 Canadian Women’s Studies Association annual book prize for Negotiating Citizenship: Migrant Women in Canada and the Global System (University of Toronto, 2005).   Her other books include: Gender and Multiculturalism: North-South Perspectives (ed. with A. Gouws, University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2016); Not One of the Family: Foreign Domestic Workers in Canada (ed. with A. Bakan, University of Toronto Press); and Unsettling Settler Societies: Articulations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Class (ed. with N. Yuval-Davis, Sage Publications).  She is currently completing a book on The Emotional Cartographies of Dual Citizenship: The Lebanese Diaspora and the 2006 War and a Special Issue (with B. Rutherford and Z. Jinnah) of Studies in Social Justice on Migration and Intersectionality: Perspectives from the Global South and North.

    Professor Stasiulis has harnessed her research to support the advocacy of domestic worker associations, and other vulnerable populations (e.g. the stateless), and served as the Chair of the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Violence Against Asian Migrant Workers. She has been a consultant to the Canadian federal government on policies pertaining to racism and anti-racism, migration, employment equity, political participation of ethnic minorities, and gender and equity analysis of immigration policy.

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  • 2019 Nov 04

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    Rethinking the Pro- and Anti-Immigration Dichotomy: Contingencies and Complexities in Why Canada is an Immigrant ‘Welcoming’ Country

    Vic Satzewich, Professor of Sociology, McMaster University and Past-President of the Canadian Sociological Association

    Vic Satzewich is Professor of Sociology at McMaster University and Past-President of the Canadian Sociological Association.  In 2007 he was awarded the Association’s Outstanding Contribution Award.  His 2015 book Points of Entry: How Canada’s Visa Officers Decide Who Gets In (UBC Press) was awarded the John Porter Tradition of Excellence Prize.  His other books include The Ukrainian Diaspora (Routledge); Racism and the Incorporation of Foreign Labour: Farm Labour Migration to Canada Since 1945 (Routledge); Racism in Canada (Oxford University Press); ‘Race’ and Ethnicity in Canada: A Critical Introduction (Oxford University Press); and First Nations: Race, Class and Gender Relations (with Terry Wotherspoon, University of Regina Press). His current SSHRC-funded research project is on immigration consulting.

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