Past Events

  • 2021 Feb 17

    Special Event The Ecology of Economic Thought

    9:30am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.


    ‘Struggling to Remake the Market: The Feed-in-Tariff and the Neo-Liberal Roots of German Climate Politics’ 
    Stephen Milder (Groningen)
    Discussants: Adam Tooze (Columbia) and Viktor Pressfeldt (Lund)

    'Market Governance, Obstruction, and Denial: Neoliberal Environmental Thought and Policy in Sweden, 1988–2015’ 
    Kristoffer Ekberg(Chalmers) and Viktor Pressfeldt (Lund)
    Discussants: Stephen Milder and Stephen Gross

    ‘'Challenging Economic Times: Temporality in Critiques of Economized Nature, 1985–1995’ 
    Julia Nordblad (Uppsala)
    Discussants David Schorr (Tel Aviv) and Antoine Missemer (CIRED Paris)

    Please register herehttps://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_OxUmr3ziTN-h3G1CGTvWLg

     

  • 2021 Feb 10

    Special Event The Ecology of Economic Thought

    9:30am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.


    ‘Energy and Environmental Economics After the Oil Shock: The Rise of Ecological Modernization’ 
    Stephen Gross (NYU)
    Discussants: Adam Tooze (Columbia) and Nathalie Berta (Reims)

    ‘Resilience in Context’
    Irene Sotiropoulou (Hull)
    Discussants: Venus Bivar and Troy Vettese (Harvard University)

    ‘Socialist Valuation of Nature: Environmental Regulation and the Development of Political Economy in the Soviet Union, 1965​–​1991’ Roman Gilmintinov (Duke)
    Discussants: Guy Oakes (Monmouth) and Irene Sotiropoulou (Hull)

    Please Register Here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zRcfRXTzTyKfXETai6TCQQ

     

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  • 2021 Feb 08

    Special Event

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom event, please register

    "Lessons from the COVID-19 Response in Canada"

    A Conversation

    Speakers:
    The Hon. Harjit S. Sajjan, Canada’s Minister of National Defence

    Juliette Kayyem, Belfer Senior Lecturer in International Security and Faculty Director of the Homeland Security Project at Harvard Kennedy School

    Canada took early steps to manage the spread of COVID-19 by closing borders, limiting travel, and instituting lockdowns at the provincial level. Although these early efforts initially succeeded in managing the spread of COVID-19, they failed to prevent a second wave of cases from overwhelming the country’s public health system. The situation became so dire in Canada’s largest province, Ontario, that private long-term care facilities required military support to manage patient care. The Hon. Harjit S. Sajjan, Canada’s Minister of National Defence, will join Juliette Kayyem, Belfer Senior Lecturer in International Security and Faculty Director of the Homeland Security Project at Harvard Kennedy School, to discuss these and other experiences in Canada’s response to COVID-19. 

    This conversation is part of a year-long, virtual discussion series "Crisis Leadership in a Pandemic: Lessons Learned in the Fight Against COVID-19", sponsored by the Program on Crisis Leadership and the Ash Center.

    Cosponsored by the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

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  • 2021 Feb 08

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This event is a Zoom meeting. Registration is required.

    Seeking Refuge in Dangerous Times

    A rise in brutal wars and natural disasters has propelled an unprecedented amount of people to leave their homes in search of refuge. Fleeing violence and despair, they often find that the journey and even the arrival are no less dangerous and dehumanizing. Seeking refuge in Europe thousands drowned crossing the Mediterranean Sea. Seeking refuge in the United States, families were torn apart and incarcerated. While Canada remains a beacon of hope for many, asylum and resettlement processes are lengthy, complex, and often accompanied by experiences of racialization and marginalization. The fact that today’s responses to refugee movements are guided by national interests, cultural anxieties, welfare chauvinism, and the politics of closed borders was further heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic. The papers of this panel explore what it means and takes to seek and being granted refuge in dangerous times.

     

    Please register here:  https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0kf-Ghpz0uH9zrvY4b-aGNMqs5vt0O3BMD

     

    "Here and There"
    Heba Gowayed, Assistant Profressor of Sociology, Boston University
    This presentation entitled "Here and There" examines how refugee lives remain connected to people back home or in the broader diaspora as they settle into countries of resettlement and asylum. It follows how these relationships are maintained, and their impact on people "here" in countries of resettlement and asylum emotionally and materially, and "there" in destination contexts through remittances and attempts to reunify through citizenship. This presentation draws from my book Refuge which examines how the United States, Canada, and Germany, as receiving countries, shape refugee resources and potential.

    "Irregular Border Crossings and Asylum Seekers in Canada: A Complex Intergovernmental Problem"
    Mireille Paquet, Associate Professor of Political Science, Concordia University
    Robert Schertzer, Associate Professor University of Toronto
    Between 2017 and mid-2020, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) intercepted 59,658 people as they crossed into Canada outside official ports of entry. This spike in crossings was a clear break with past trends and with Canada’s managed migration programs. A large majority of these migrants went on to apply for refugee status in Canada. Supporting asylum seekers falls to the provinces where they settle but border enforcement and refugee status determination are the responsibility of the federal Canada. As a consequence, these crossings have become a contentious issue between Canadian provinces and the federal government. This presentation will explore how Canada’s intergovernmental system reacted to the increase of irregular border crossings, beginning in 2017 and how this complex intergovernmental problems challenges the established norm of multilateralism in intergovernmental relations on migration in Canada. 

    "How COVID-19 has affected the settlement experiences of refugees in Canada and the United States"
    Lori Wilkinson, Department of Sociology and Criminology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada 
    The pandemic and its associated social, government, and economic restrictions have upended the societies we live in. What is largely forgotten as we scramble to reorganize and resolve many of the social problems that COVID-19 is the resettled refugees. With borders closed, the refugees already living in Canada and the USA have found themselves with precarious access to settlement services, language classes, health services and economic support, all vital components of successful integration. Using findings from two separate Canadian Institutes for Health Research projects, this presentation provides a brief overview of two current projects: one involving the socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19 among refugees in Canada and the US, the other examining gender-based violence among newcomers in seven countries. Findings indicate that precarity among resettled refugees in both countries has increased, particularly in terms of foodbank use, loss of jobs, work in dangerous employment, and the increased experience of violence in the home.

    "The European asylum regime in the 21st century"
    Blanca Garcés-Mascareñas, Senior Research Fellow, Barcelona Centre for International Affairs
    The end of the 20th century witnessed major changes in global asylum regimes towards a less generous approach to refugees. The European Union main approach was to keep refugees in their region of origin or transit, by closing borders and externalising migration control to third countries. The 2015 refugee crisis and the 2020 Covid19 pandemia have represented another shift in the European asylum regime, adding to the later the creation of spaces of contention (and exception) at the EU borders. Taking into account this context, the paper will analyse the so-called «prison islands» (also called cage islands), where the multiple crisis that cross contemporary Europe implode in a very limited and circumscribed geographic space.

     

    Chair: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University 

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  • 2021 Feb 03

    Special Event The Ecology of Economic Thought

    9:30am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.


    ‘The Limits to Certainty and the Metaphysics of Infinitude’ 
    Nandita Badami (UC Irvine)
    Discussants: Venus Bivar (York) and Kristoffer Ekberg (Chalmers)

    ‘Writing the History of Ecological Economic Thought’ 
    Antoine Missemer (CIRED Paris) and Marco Paulo Vianna Franco (KLI)
    Discussants: Julia Nordblad (Uppsala) and Matthias Schmelzer (Jena)

    ‘Critiques of Growth in Historical Context’ 
    Matthias Schmelzer (Jena)
    Discussants: Roman Gilmintinov (Duke) and Glenda Sluga (EUI)

    Please register herehttps://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QQRtKHx2SFaYIU-0ovMGJw

     

  • 2021 Jan 27

    Special Event the Ecology of Economic Thought

    9:30am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    ‘​An Empire of ‘Growth and Nurture’: Ecology, Documentary Film, and Development in Britain’s Empire Marketing Board, 1926​–​1933’
    Paul Erikson (Wesleyan)
    Discussants: Nahid Aslanbeigui (Monmouth) and Thomas Turnbull (MPI Berlin)

    ‘Pigou on Urban Ecology, "Pigouvian Taxes", and the Limits of Economic Policy’ 
    Nahid Aslanbeigui and Guy Oakes (Monmouth)
    Discussants: Chris Jones (Arizona) and Robert Leonard (UQAM)

    Please register here:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_e_QPGa01Rvi9Fimp3p8ezA

     

  • 2021 Jan 26

    Special Event Animals, Capital, and the Law

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.


    “Off-Animals, Creatures of an Exhausted Industrial Capitalism”
    Alex Blanchette (Tufts University)
    Discussant: Amy Fitzgerald (University of Windsor)
    “Off-animals,” as they are called by some managers of North American pork production, are the biological refuse of agribusiness’s efforts to realize standardized hog life and death. Ranging from aged boars to misshapen pigs, recent attempts to industrially slaughter these creatures for meat has led to a shadow infrastructure of killing that underpins the world’s largest factory farms. Arching through and beyond Blanchette’s recent book, Porkopolis: American Animality, Standardized Life, and the Factory Farm (2020), this talk outlines an ethnography of these animals to offer new lines of sight onto the waning state of industrial labor and value in Canada and the United States today.

    Registration is required.

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1ELK-Ml-TbmKB0LBMlvmcQ

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  • 2020 Apr 13

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    Speaking topic: TBA

    Ratna Omidvar, Independent Senator for Ontario, Senate of Canada

     

     

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  • 2020 Apr 07

    Canada Program Special Event

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Room 450, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED


    When States Take Rights Back: Citizenship Revocation and Its Discontents
    (E. Fargues, E. Winter, M. Gibney, eds)

    Speaker: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program, WCFIA, and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

    Commentator: Audrey Macklin, Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, Chair in International Human Rights Law, University of Toronto

    Cosponsored by the Comparative Inequality and Inclusion Cluster, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Culture and Social Analysis Workshop, Department of Sociology, Harvard University

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  • 2020 Apr 06

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    Working Against and With the State:  The Law and Politics of Refugee Sanctuary and Resettlement

    Audrey Macklin, Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, Chair in International Human Rights Law, University of Toronto

    Professor Audrey Macklin (BSc. (Alberta), LLB (Toronto), LLM (Yale) is Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Chair in International Human Rights Law at the University of Toronto. She teaches, researches and writes in the area of migration and citizenship law, business and human rights, and administrative law. She has published widely in domestic, international, and interdisciplinary journals and edited collections. Prof. Macklin is a frequent commentator in Canadian and international print, radio and television media. Her op-eds have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, and The Washington Post. From 1994-96, Professor Macklin was a Member of the Canada's Immigration and Refugee Board, where she adjudicated refugee claims. She was involved in the case of Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen detained for almost a decade by the United States at Guantànamo Bay. She was an observer for Human Rights Watch at the Military Commission proceedings against Mr. Khadr in Guantànamo Bay, and represented Human Rights Watch as intervener before the Supreme Court of Canada in two Khadr appeals. Professor Macklin has also acted as pro bono intervener counsel or academic legal advisor in several public interest human rights cases, including legal challenges to security certificates, withdrawal of health care for refugees, citizenship revocation, deportation of long-term permanent residents, and the ban on niqabs at citizenship ceremonies. Prof. Macklin was named a Trudeau Fellow in 2017, and awarded the Ludwik and Estelle Jus Human Rights Award in 2019 and the Carolyn Tuohy Public Policy Impact Award in 2020.

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