Past Events

  • 2021 Nov 01

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    Free Expression and the Regulation of Online Content in the Canadian Context

    Michael Geist, law professor at the University of Ottawa, and Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law

    The Canadian government has embarked on a major Internet regulation initiative that includes new broadcast rules, policies to counter online harms, and mandated support for the news sector. This talk will examine the latest proposals and assess their implications for freedom of expression in Canada.

    This is a Zoom Webinar event, please register here:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_eVuSAe0fReOTSB1URfunLw

    Dr. Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law and is a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society. He regularly appears in the Globe and Mail, is the editor of several monthly technology law publications, and the author of a popular blog on Internet and intellectual property law issues. Dr. Geist serves on many boards, including Ingenium, Internet Archive Canada, and the EFF Advisory Board. He was appointed to the Order of Ontario in 2018 and has received numerous awards for his work including the Kroeger Award for Policy Leadership and the Public Knowledge IP3 Award in 2010, the Les Fowlie Award for Intellectual Freedom from the Ontario Library Association in 2009, the EFF’s Pioneer Award in 2008, and Canarie’s IWAY Public Leadership Award for his contribution to the development of the Internet in Canada. 

  • 2021 Sep 13

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    City, State: Constitutionalism and the Megacity

    Ran Hirschl, Professor of Government and the Earl E. Sheffield Regents Professor of Law, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Law

    This is a Zoom Webinar event, please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zzsZqGSnQ2iC6id0QBliJA

    Ran Hirschl (Ph.D., Yale University) is Professor of Government and the Earl E. Sheffield Regents Chair in Law at the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he was Professor of Political Science and Law at the University of Toronto, where he held the Canada Research Chair in Constitutionalism, Democracy and Development. He studies constitutional law and constitutional institutions and their intersection with comparative politics and society. Professor Hirschl is the author of over 120 articles and book chapters, as well as several major books including City, State: Constitutionalism and the Megacity (Oxford University Press, 2020)—winner of the Stein Rokkan Prize in Comparative Social Science Research; Comparative Matters: The Renaissance of Comparative Constitutional Law (Oxford University Press, 2014)—winner of the American Political Science Association (APSA) Herman Pritchett Award for the best book on law and courts; Constitutional Theocracy (Harvard University Press, 2010)—winner of the Mahoney Prize in Legal Theory; and Towards Juristocracy: The Origins and Consequences of the New Constitutionalism (Harvard University Press, 2004)—winner of the APSA Law & Courts Section Lasting Contribution Award.


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  • 2021 Apr 27

    Special Event Animals Capital and the Law

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.


    “Provisioning People and Other Animals Since the 18th Century”
    Anya Zilberstein (Concordia University)
    Discussant: John Clegg (The University of Chicago)

    It is generally assumed that the first feedlots date to the late nineteenth century, but the rationale, practice, and debate on providing fodder to livestock in year-round confinement emerged much earlier in Europe and the colonial Americas on dairy, ranching, and breeding farms. In the eighteenth-century British empire, moreover, interest in new methods of feeding livestock contributed to broader policy and legislative debates about reforms to food welfare for destitute or dependent people such as orphans, sailors, hospital patients, prisoners, and the enslaved. These efforts culminated in statutes such as the Leeward Islands’ Amelioration Act of 1798 and Britain’s New Poor Law of 1834. Jeremy Bentham, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Malthus, and many others argued that dietary reformers should follow the lead of innovative husbandmen who minimized the expense of feeding their non-human charges. Even the same kinds of foods (mostly starchy vegetables such as potatoes, maize, barley, and oats) and their preparation for cattle, sheep, and horses, it was thought, could be used to provision low-status people. This interlinked history of food for people and for other animals presages several key features of industrial food and agriculture—from routine uses of laboratory animals as model organisms for human nutrition experiments to the ubiquity of corn and soy derivatives in processed foods formulated for human consumption and as farmed animal fodder.

    Registration is required.

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Q8z35WC6Sz2GqLmUHq8JtQ

  • 2021 Apr 12

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom Webinar event, please register using the link below

    Struggles for Justice in the Great White North

    In the wake of the movement for racial justice and the defense of black lives, it is important to contextualize conflicts involving race, status and power, including around the use of the “n-word,” and to consider how they are framed differently across national contexts with varying historical legacies, immigration regimes, and transnational influences. This panel focuses on the Canadian and Quebec cases against the backdrop of American and European experiences.

    This is a Webinar event. Please register here: 
    https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ApquBONNTZKIpIELlU45CQ

    The Sacralization of Racism in the Anglosphere
    Eric Kaufmann, Professor of Politics, Birckbeck, University of London

    This paper will draw on John McWhorter’s notion of the ‘religion of antiracism’ and survey data to examine the social construction, in elite institutions, of a discourse of pervasive ‘systemic’ racism. This is out of alignment with measurable phenomena that can be conceptually defined as racism. I argue that today’s cultural left, and to some extent society more broadly, has been shaped by narratives, myths and symbols which stem from periods when the problem was more severe. These narratives are propelling the radicalization of left-wing spaces, and are even affecting the policy flexibility of left-wing parties such as the Democrats or Labour in Britain. In English but not French Canada, this discourse has its greatest power, even constraining the Conservative Party. Younger and university-educated segments of public opinion are increasingly influenced by this central narrative. The outcome of this form of politics will, in my estimation, produce an increase in political polarization.

    Plantation U: Labour, race, state and the struggle against command capitalism
    Tamari Kitossa, Associate Professor of Sociology, Brock University

    The interference of Harvard administrators to deny Dr. Cornel West the justly earned security of tenure mirrors the Black Canadian Studies Association boycott of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences for its anti-Black racism. Each reflects a common theme that the university, in the dénouement of capitalism, is in crisis – ethically, fiscally, morally and politically. In my opinion, the administrative fiat of the academic administrative class, whom Ferdindand Lundberg called ed pols, and the economic insecurity of even the most qualified scholars, signals the necessity to resist the interchangeable authoritarianism of the political class and the corporate capitalist militarized command economy. The redux of the James O’Connor’s The Corporations and the State is a return of repressed questions of labour, property, power and struggle for the state to protect the interests of excluded and exploited communities and workers from the necropolitical neoliberalism. In heated milieu in which we find ourselves, anti-racism, ‘ethnic studies’ and the hiring and tenuring of professors from historically downpressed communities reflects the broader dynamic of what Mao Tse Tung called the ‘primary contradiction’: that of the state against the people.

    The Great White North: Race and Reckoning in Canada
    Debra Thompson, Associate Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in Racial Inequality in Democratic Societies, McGill University

    What defines the boundaries of Blackness and belonging in Canada? Using the analytical insights of black political thought, I use personal narrative to make the case that there’s something truly unique about Blackness and the persistence of anti-Black racism in Canada, in part because of the lingering, ubiquitous specter of Black America. Tethering territorial and temporal boundaries to our contemporary understandings of race and racism, the presentation seeks to both reconsider and recalibrate ideas of home, belonging, and the meaning of diaspora.

    Dimensions of Whiteness: A self-reflexive exploration
    Anna Triandafyllidou, Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration, Ryerson University

    The pandemic emergency and the Black Lives Matter movement have made particularly evident the multiple dimensions of socio economic, ethnic, religious and racial inequalities that structure our societies in Europe and North America. And yet the request for justice and equity comes at the backdrop of rising populism and white supremacism in both sides of the Atlantic. While many researchers have delved into both the multiple dimensions of discrimination and inequality that racialized minorities and Black people suffer and the multiple – often invisible or intangible – aspects of white privilege, I feel there is a need to further unpack ‘whiteness’ as a racial or ethnic category precisely because it has so far been treated as the ‘default’ category. The very use of terms like brown, shadeism, racialized minorities denote that those who are racialized are non-white, as if white is the ‘natural’ category (even though the majority of the world’s population is not ‘white’). My exploration is self-reflexive as I am white by skin colour but not ‘white’ in the way that this category is used in a North American settler colonial context. Coming also from a migration studies perspective, I am particularly interested in the socio-economic and geopolitical connotations of different degrees of ‘whiteness’, their shifting contextual nature, or the related religious and cultural nuances. This presentation (and future paper) explores the different dimensions of whiteness, its intersectional and contextual nature, and the elasticity of whiteness as a socio-political and ethno-racial category. Ultimately the paper seeks to unpack whiteness in ways that illuminate the complex inequalities that structure advanced capitalist societies today and the ways these play out in different domestic and transnational contexts.

    Chair: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University, and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

     

     

    Eric Kaufmann is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck, University of London. He is the author of Whiteshift: Immigration, Populism and the Future of White Majorities (Penguin/Abrams, 2018/19); Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth (Profile Books 2010), The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America (Harvard 2004), The Orange Order (Oxford, 2007) and one other book. He is co-editor, among others, of Political Demography (Oxford 2012) and editor of Rethinking Ethnicity: Majority Groups and Dominant Minorities (Routledge 2004).

    Dr. Tamari Kitossa is Associate Professor of Sociology at Brock University. He earned his BA (Hon) and Magisteriate degrees at York University and his Ph.D. at OISE/UT. He is editor and contributor to three books: Appealing Because He is Appalling: Black masculinities, colonialism and erotic racism (University of Alberta Press), Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy: Teaching, learning and researching while Black(University of Toronto Press) and African Canadian Leadership: Continuity, Transition, and Transformation(University of Toronto Press).

    Debra Thompson is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in Racial Inequality in Democratic Societies at McGill University. Her award-winning book, The Schematic State: Race, Transnationalism, and the Politics of the Census (Cambridge University Press, 2016) is a study of the political development of racial classifications on the national censuses of the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. She is currently writing an academic book that explores the transnational dynamics of the Black Lives Matter movement and a non-fiction book about race, racism, and resilience across the Canadian/US border.

    Anna Triandafyllidou holds the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University, Toronto. She was previously based at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy where she held a Robert Schuman Chair on Cultural Pluralism in the EUI’s Global Governance Programme. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies. Her recent publications include: Rethinking Migration and Return in Southeastern Europe (with E. Gemi, Routledge, 2021) and two edited volumes: the Routledge Handbook on the Governance of Religious Diversity (2020, co-ed. with T. Magazzini) and Migrants with Irregular Status in Europe (2020, with S. Spencer, Springer Open). She recently published two papers that are somehow connected to this one: Nationalism in the 21st Century: Neo-Tribal or Plural? in Nations and Nationalism; and De-centering the Study of Migration Governance: a Radical View in Geopolitics.

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  • 2021 Mar 30

    Special Event Animals Capital and the Law

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    “Co-Workers or Living Factories? Biotechnology and the Concept of Animal Labour”
    Kenneth Fish (The Universith of Winnipeg)
    Discussant: Will Kymlicka (Queen’s University)
    In 2000 Nexia Biotechnologies of Montreal introduced its first BELE® goats, Peter and Webster. Genetically engineered with the DNA of an orb weaver spider, Peter and Webster would sire whole herds of spider-goats whose ‘silky milk’ could be processed into BioSteel® for use in everything from sporting equipment to bullet-proof vests. The goats became the new faces of a fledgling animal biotechnology industry whose potential to position transgenic animals as instruments of production seemed to confirm the greatest hopes and fears surrounding genetic engineering. Peter and Webster made headlines in Canada and abroad, and even found their way into Margaret Atwood’s dystopian science fiction novel Oryx and Crake. But perhaps these spider-goats and their transgenic kin, rather than instruments of production, might better be viewed as workers? The concept of animal labour has become popular in critical animal studies and is intended to grasp the role of non-humans in the production process in a way that avoids regarding them as passive objects of human manipulation. The example of transgenic animals highlights the analytical and political limitations of the concept of animal labour and presents an alternative rooted in Marx’s theorization of the labour process. I will argue that conceptualizing animals as ‘living factories’ better captures their role in the production process and raises a more fruitful set of questions concerning their alienation and the kinds of social transformations that might assist in their liberation.

    Registration is required.

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_4ak24DVbTQShTvugy4Y0qA

     

  • 2021 Mar 22

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom event, please register using the link below.

    Rethinking Citizenship in the Anthropocene

    This panel explores the relationship between the ecology and membership in the polis. Modern citizenship prescribes a bundle of rights and duties, active participation in self-governance, as well as identity and belonging; it is usually tied to a nation-state. In the Anthropocene, humans and human activity have become major geophysical force with lasting impacts on climate and the environment. These impacts force us to destabilize taken-for-granted divisions not only between societies, but also between “humans” and “non-humans”, as well as between “nature” and “culture” more generally. How then do nature-society interactions in the Anthropocene challenge the meanings and boundaries of citizenship? What can we learn from Indigenous knowledge and scholarship on these issues?

    Registration is required, please register here: 
    https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUkcuurqzosHNTFsMwDFGkujqjjQqw4eJ1o

     

    Anticolonial Critiques of the Anthropocene

    Jaskiran Dhillon is an anti-colonial scholar and organizer who grew up on Treaty Six Cree Territory in Saskatchewan, Canada. Her work has been published in The Guardian, The Nation, Cultural Anthropology, Feminist Formations, Environment and Society, Social Texts, and Decolonization among other venues. She is the author of Prairie Rising: Indigenous Youth, Decolonization, and the Politics of Intervention (2017) and co-editor of Standing with Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement (2019). Jaskiran is an associate professor of global studies and anthropology at The New School and president of The New School's AAUP Chapter.

    Indigenous Pathways to Alternative Relational Futures

    Michelle Daigle is Mushkegowuk (Cree), a member of Constance Lake First Nation in Treaty 9, and of French ancestry. She is an Assistant Professor in the Centre for Indigenous Studies and the Department of Geography & Planning at the University of Toronto. Her research examines colonial capitalist dispossession and violence on Indigenous lands and bodies, as well as Indigenous practices of resurgence and freedom. Her current research focusses on the renewal of Indigenous relations of care that emerge through Mushkegowuk waterways, and how those generate decolonial possibilities within conditions of extractive violence. Michelle’s writing has been published in Antipode, Environment & Planning D,Political Geography and Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society.

    Indigenous Plant Kinship in the Canadian Oil Sands

    Janelle Baker (Métis ancestry) is Assistant Professor in Anthropology at Athabasca University in northern Alberta, Canada. Her research is on sakâwiyiniwak (Northern Bush Cree) experiences with wild food contamination in Treaty No. 8 territory, which is an area of extreme extraction of bitumen and forests. In this context, Janelle collaborates with Bigstone Cree Nation environmental monitors using community-based methods and ethnoecology to test moose and water samples, while partnering with microbiologists who use a metagenomics approach to study the composition of microbiomes to map the source of potential harmful contaminants. Janelle is also co-PI with Métis anthropologist Zoe Todd on a project that is restor(y)ing land use governance and bull trout population health in a contested area of the Rocky Mountain foothills in Alberta, Canada. Janelle is the North Americas Representative on the Board of Directors for the International Society of Ethnobiology and a Co-Editor of Ethnobiology Letters, a gold open-access online peer-reviewed journal. She is the winner of the 2019 Canadian Association for Graduate Studies - ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award, Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences category.

    Discussant: Christina Shivers is a fifth-year PhD candidate in Urban and Landscape Studies, at Harvard's Graduate School of Design, researching the politics of environmental planning. Her dissertation investigates the rise of market-based environmental policies since the 1970s through researching the influence of ecology and economics on resource extraction in both Canada and the United States. Her work looks to mined-land reclamation programs established in North American and the manner in which scientific and spatial research associated with these programs influenced environmental policy at the national and global scales

    Chair: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University, and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

     

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  • 2021 Mar 08

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:20pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom meeting. Please use the link below to register.

    "Canadian Oil at a Crossroads"
    Natural resources have long figured at the heart of Canada’s national imaginary and political economy. For the past half-century, Canadian resources [or oil? petroleum?] have played a crucial political and economic role in fueling the expansion of US capitalism. But catastrophic climate change, Canada’s promises of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, and growing cross-border movements for Indigenous rights and climate justice, have thrown the assumed expansion of the North American oil industry into question. The papers in this panel place the current conjuncture in context, examining the history, politics, and ideologies underpinning Canada’s oil economy. Together they highlight this powerful industry’s conditions of possibility and ask what the current moment means for the future—and perhaps the end—of Canadian oil.

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErcuysqDoiGdFNTfJFvv41lkhLB-P...

     

    Keeping Fossil Fuels in the Ground: The Future of Climate Policy?
    Angela Carter, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science & Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo

    National restrictions on fossil fuel extraction are emerging as an important “supply side” policy approach to avoid worst-case climate crises. In rapid succession since 2017, multiple countries have proposed moratoria on fossil fuel extraction as part of the global effort to reduce emissions dramatically. These bans are historic, ambitious policies that are opening a new avenue for confronting the climate crisis—and signalling the beginning of a global fossil fuel phaseout. How and why are these bans unfolding, and what do they mean for Canada and its “petro-provinces”?

    “They just work, and they seem to do it well”: Mobile work and social identities in the Alberta oil industry
    Katie Mazer, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University

    Extreme labor mobility is a longstanding feature of Canadian resource development. Workers have often travelled out of peripheral, high unemployment areas of Canada in search of work in resource industries thousands of miles from home. Employers in these crises-ridden industries benefit from these workers’ willingness to travel, tolerate periodic layoffs, and work for relatively low wages. Examining mobility between high unemployment areas of
    Atlantic Canada and Alberta, this paper interrogates the economic imaginaries that underpin these unlikely and grueling labor pathways. While workers from this region have long been characterized as state-dependent and averse to work, today employers, employment counsellors, and workers themselves describe east coast men are a “natural fit” for mobile work in resource extraction. I argue that, despite the distance and volatility of mobile resource work, the interplay of stories that pathologize and celebrate these workers has encouraged their attachment to resource extraction as the only viable pathway to a better life. These findings speak to debates about energy transitions by highlighting how social identities—in this case, white, rural, working-class masculinities—constrain how people imagine their futures, tethering them to fossil fuels. Alongside economies and cultures, that is, identities must also shift in the transition to a post-carbon economy.

    Ecology in Service of Extraction: Surface-Mined Land Reclamation in Alberta
    Christina Shivers, PhD Candidate, Harvard University

    Oil extraction in Alberta has immense ramifications, negatively affecting the environment from the local scale to the global. While anthropologists, geographers, and sociologists have analyzed the relationship of recent increases in tar sands oil production to the dispossession of Indigenous communities, wildlife habitat loss, pollution and increased carbon emissions, mining in the Athabasca joins a longer history of settler-colonial practices inherently based on mineral extraction of all types. This paper discusses the history of private programs focused on surface-mined land reclamation in Alberta and western Canada beginning in the 1960s. These programs were developed by coal and oil mining companies in the wake of a large, trans-continental citizen protest movement against coal and oil extraction that aimed to achieve full strip-mining abolition. Recognizing the existential threat abolition posed to their industry, coal and oil mining companies organized land-reclamation research programs to restore mined landscapes to a state equal to or better than the landscape that existed prior to extraction. Through an analysis of the private reclamation programs that emerged in Alberta in the 1970s, this paper argues that mining and energy companies seized upon popular environmental concerns and crafted their reclamation programs to not only continue, but expand extraction, altering state priorities in the process. Using ecological research and scientific planning methods, reclamation programs like Syncrude Canada worked to convince the public of the mining industry’s vital contribution to conserving the environment in the province. In the process, reclamation professionals partnered with provincial authorities to create new – and profitable – land uses like agricultural lands, rangelands, and working forests. This history reveals the longer influence of energy and mining companies on the state’s environmental priorities from the outset. 

    The Road to the Keystone XL Campaign, 1992–2015
    Troy Vettese, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University

    Michael Marx, the director of the Keystone XL campaign, has remained a surprisingly obscure figure despite his influence in shaping the contemporary environmental movement. One has to remember that it was only recently that pipelines became an intensely politicized infrastructure. To understand the tactics he employed against the Keystone XL pipeline, it is necessary to examine his previous campaigns. Marx’s career as an environmentalist began in the early 1990s when he led Rainforest Action Network’s fight against Mitsubishi for its role in tropical logging. He then led campaigns to create a park in British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest and against Wal-Mart in the US to push it to green its operations. Insights gleaned from these earlier campaigns coalesced in 2008 when he initiated the struggle against the Keystone XL pipeline. Marx’s innovations in environmental activism include: directly targeting and negotiating with a corporation, using building permits as leverage, working closely with First Nations, and bringing in the government to oversee the implementation of an NGO-corporate truce. 

    Chair: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

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  • 2021 Feb 24

    Special Event The Ecology of Economic Thought

    9:30am to 11:30am

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    February 24 ​Empire ii

    ‘From Svamiji’s Ashram to Whitehall: Instrumentalising the British Government during the 1973 Oil Crisis’ Thomas Turnbull (MPI Berlin)
    Discussants: Nandita Badami (UCal, Irvine) and Fredrik Albritton Jonsson (Chicago)

    ‘Between the Hand-loom and the Samson Stripper: The Contradictory Worlds of E. F. Schumacher’ Robert Leonard (UQAM)
    Discussants: Paul Erikson (Wesleyan) and Marco Paulo Vianna Franco (Konrad Lorenz Institute)

    Please register herehttps://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ix9YUod_TbiCUkhZPUAYXQ

     

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  • 2021 Feb 23

    Special Event Animals, Capital, and the Law

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    “Ag-Gag in Canada and the Constitutional Right to See”
    Jodi Lazare (Dalhousie University)
    Discussant: Maneesha Deckha (University of Victoria)
    Recently adopted legislation in two Canadian provinces imposes severe penalties for trespassing on, or gaining entry under false pretenses, private property used for animal agriculture; it also restricts interfering with the transport of farmed animals to slaughter. These laws (dubbed “ag-gag” laws in the United States, where they were first introduced) respond to undercover investigations on farms, the peaceful occupation of farms, and the act of bearing witness to animals headed for slaughter. This presentation suggests that these laws constitute an unjustifiable limit on the right to freedom of expression as protected by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It does so by rejecting the traditional anthropocentric understanding of constitutional rights, according to which Charter protections are limited to the interests of humans and relations between them. Instead, by emphasizing the ethical and political aspects of animal rights advocacy, it places interspecies relations and the ethics of animal rights at the centre of the constitutional protections.

    Registration is required.

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_d3eJ-CQFS2Wx-L4y2tUSGA

  • 2021 Feb 22

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom meeting. Registration is required. Please use the link below to register

    When States Take Rights Back: Citizenship Revocation and its Discontents

    Once considered outdated, citizenship revocation, the act of stripping born or naturalized citizens of their civic, political, social, and cultural membership rights has again increased in importance over the past two decades. Gaining traction in the cases of returning jihadists and supposedly fraudulent citizenship applications, citizenship revocation is an extreme case of unbelonging.
    This workshop will examine what citizenship revocation means for those doing and undergoing it, as well as its social and symbolic repercussions. It situates the 2020 book “When States Take Rights Back: Citizenship Revocation and Its Discontents” by Emilien Fargues, Elke Winter and Matthew Gibney in a wider debate on boundary-drawing through expulsion, contingent citizenship, and the lack/loss of legal status. 

     

    Please register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErc-CurTovHNIE16TMum1kTDkWPPofKywi

     

    “When States Take Rights Back: Citizenship Revocation and its Discontents”
    Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University
    Émilien Fargues, Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute

    "Unmaking Citizens: U.S. Federal Judges’ Denaturalization Decisions in an Era of Mass Deportation”
    Asad L. Asad, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University

    “The Logics of citizenship revocation”
    Audrey Macklin Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Chair in International Human Rights Law at the University of Toronto

     

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