Past Events

  • 2020 Apr 13

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    Speaking topic: TBA

    Ratna Omidvar, Independent Senator for Ontario, Senate of Canada

     

     

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  • 2020 Apr 07

    Canada Program Special Event

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Room 450, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED


    When States Take Rights Back: Citizenship Revocation and Its Discontents
    (E. Fargues, E. Winter, M. Gibney, eds)

    Speaker: Elke Winter, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program, WCFIA, and Professor of Sociology, University of Ottawa

    Commentator: Audrey Macklin, Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, Chair in International Human Rights Law, University of Toronto

    Cosponsored by the Comparative Inequality and Inclusion Cluster, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Culture and Social Analysis Workshop, Department of Sociology, Harvard University

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  • 2020 Apr 06

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    Working Against and With the State:  The Law and Politics of Refugee Sanctuary and Resettlement

    Audrey Macklin, Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, Chair in International Human Rights Law, University of Toronto

    Professor Audrey Macklin (BSc. (Alberta), LLB (Toronto), LLM (Yale) is Director of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Chair in International Human Rights Law at the University of Toronto. She teaches, researches and writes in the area of migration and citizenship law, business and human rights, and administrative law. She has published widely in domestic, international, and interdisciplinary journals and edited collections. Prof. Macklin is a frequent commentator in Canadian and international print, radio and television media. Her op-eds have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, and The Washington Post. From 1994-96, Professor Macklin was a Member of the Canada's Immigration and Refugee Board, where she adjudicated refugee claims. She was involved in the case of Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen detained for almost a decade by the United States at Guantànamo Bay. She was an observer for Human Rights Watch at the Military Commission proceedings against Mr. Khadr in Guantànamo Bay, and represented Human Rights Watch as intervener before the Supreme Court of Canada in two Khadr appeals. Professor Macklin has also acted as pro bono intervener counsel or academic legal advisor in several public interest human rights cases, including legal challenges to security certificates, withdrawal of health care for refugees, citizenship revocation, deportation of long-term permanent residents, and the ban on niqabs at citizenship ceremonies. Prof. Macklin was named a Trudeau Fellow in 2017, and awarded the Ludwik and Estelle Jus Human Rights Award in 2019 and the Carolyn Tuohy Public Policy Impact Award in 2020.

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  • 2020 Mar 31

    Canada Program Special Event

    3:00pm to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    National Populism and Polarization in the US, Canada, and Europe Since 2014

    Eric Kaufmann, Professor of Politics, Birkbeck College, University of London

    There has been a surge of national populism in the West since 2014. Along with this has come an increasingly polarized cultural and political climate. I argue that the backdrop to this shift is the decline of ethnic majorities in western countries. Immigration is the critical issue, not necessarily due to its effects, but because it is a symbol of ethnic change. Cultural progressivism is also a critical part of the story. The post-1960s power of this ideology has partially contributed to unprecedented demographic shifts, and is interacting with ethnic change in important ways. The power of ideas of diversity and cultural equalitarianism in elite institutions is both a cause of populist backlash and a force reacting against the rise of populism. National populism in turn responds to progressivism, in dialectical fashion. The result is a realignment of politics from the material cleavages of the twentieth century to a more cultural axis. This is accompanied by growing polarization, especially over immigration. This is as true of English Canada, where populism is ostensibly weaker, as it is of the United States, Europe and Australasia.

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  • 2020 Mar 30

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    THIS EVENT IS CANCELED

    National Boundaries and the Dehumanization and Rehumanization of Refugees

    Victoria Esses, Professor of Psychology, University of Western Ontario

    Victoria Esses is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Network for Economic and Social Trends and of the Centre for Research on Migration and Ethnic Relations at the University of Western Ontario. She is also Principal Investigator of the Pathways to Prosperity Partnership, a national alliance of university, community and government partners dedicated to fostering welcoming communities and promoting the integration of immigrants in Canada. Victoria is a Fellow of the CIFAR program, Boundaries, Membership and Belonging. Victoria’s research focuses on immigration policy and practice, including public attitudes toward immigration and cultural diversity; promising practices in settlement and integration; factors promoting the settlement and integration of immigrants; and the measurement of community welcome-ability and immigrant needs and outcomes. She has published extensively in these areas, including journal articles, book chapters, and edited volumes. Victoria is regularly consulted by federal, provincial, and municipal governments on immigration issues, and her research has had a major impact on immigration policy and practice in Canada and internationally. She has also served as an Expert Consultant for the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) on several occasions.
     

     

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  • 2020 Feb 24

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Struggle to Belong: Immigration Policies and Experiences of Temporariness in Canada

    Danièle Bélanger, Professor of Geography and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration Processes, Laval University
     
    Danièle Bélanger is Professor of Geography and holder of the Senior Canada Research Chair in Global Migration Processes at the Université Laval in Québec City (Canada). Her research examines the repercussions of migration policies on migrants’ trajectories and experiences in various parts of the world; her projects particularly pay attention to temporary migrant workers, undocumented migrants, asylum seekers, refugees, marriage and other family migrants. She conducts research projects on refugee migration in the Americas (Central Americans in Mexico) and the Middle East (Syrians in Turkey). On Mexico, she is the co-author of the book Rethinking Transit Migration. Precarity, Mobility and Self-Making in Mexico (2015, Palgrave). Research results on Turkey were recently published in Mediterranean Politics (2018), Patterns of Prejudice (2019) and in the Handbook of Migration Crises (Oxford, 2019). Her migration research on Asia was published in The Annals of Social and Political Science, Current Sociology, Asian Population Studies, Asia Pacific Migration Journal and Pacific Affairs. She is the co-editor of three edited books on Vietnam published by Springer, Stanford University Press, and in the Southeast Asian Series of Cornell University.


  • 2020 Feb 10

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Bowie Vernon Room, Room K262, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Does Racial Justice and Reconciliation Require Moving Beyond the Problem of Whiteness?


    Rima Wilkes, Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

    Is the struggle against racism a struggle against white supremacy? In both the academy and beyond, there is much discussion of the problem of whiteness and white supremacy. In this talk, I begin by using my own story and my own positionality as a basis for interrogating what has now become dominant thinking, particularly on the left, about the meaning of whiteness. Several literatures including the settler colonial, racial capitalism, critical race and critical ethnic studies literatures all center a struggle against whiteness, white privilege, white fragility and white supremacy. The binary and message about who are the “bad guys” is clear. In contrast, here I propose an alternative non-binary approach to thinking about racial justice and reconciliation that still centers the experience of racial oppression but that does not also entail blaming a particular group as oppressor. While I focus on Canada and responsibility for Indigenous genocide (and, to some extent, anti-Blackness) my hope is that the larger theoretical logic will also be of utility for thinking about moving forward on issues of racial justice and genocide in the contemporary United States of America. 


    Rima Wilkes is Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Her work has appeared in a variety of journals including International Migration Review, American Sociological Review, Science and Social Forces. She is the Past President of the Canadian Sociological Association, a past editor of the Canadian Review of Sociology and in 2017 received the UBC Killam Research Award. Her current project interrogates the oppressed/oppressor binaries that persist in the study of race and racism.  

  • 2020 Feb 03

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie Vernon Room (room K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA


    Non-Conventional Capitalism: Fracking, the Tar Sands Industry, and Peak Oil
     

    Troy Vettese, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

    Troy Vettese is an environmental historian, and graduate of New York University, where he studied neo-liberal environmental thought. He is currently turning his dissertation into a book entitled Beyond Externality, and is working on a second book for Verso with Drew Pendergrass (Harvard) on central planning and the environmental crisis. 

  • 2019 Dec 03

    Canada Program Special Event - Workshop

    9:00am to 5:00pm

    Location: 

    CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    WORKSHOP

    Pluralism in a Historical Context: Challenges and Opportunities in North America

    Speakers:

    Pluralism's Imperialism: Legality Difference on Turtle Island
    Aaron Mills, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Constitutionalism and Philosophy McGill University

    African Americans and Racial Incorporation: Preindustrial Urban Roots
    Joe Trotter, Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice, History Department, Carnegie Mellon University

    “He Couldn’t Have A Life:” State...

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