Past Events

  • 2022 Nov 28

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

    The Case for Ending Reform of the Criminal Legal System
    The Honourable Kim Pate, C.M., Senator for Ontario, The Senate of Canada


    Please register here to attend this event


    Kim Pate was appointed to the Senate of Canada on November 10, 2016. First and foremost, the mother of Michael and Madison, she is also a nationally renowned advocate who has spent the last 40 years working in and around the legal and penal systems of Canada, with and on behalf of some of the most marginalized, victimized, criminalized and institutionalized — particularly imprisoned youth, men and women. Senator Pate graduated from Dalhousie Law School in 1984 with honours in the Clinical Law Programme. She was the Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS) from January 1992 until her appointment to the Senate in November 2016. She has developed and taught Prison Law, Human Rights and Social Justice and Defending Battered Women on Trial courses at the Faculties of Law at the University of Ottawa, Dalhousie University and the University of Saskatchewan. She also occupied the Sallows Chair in Human Rights at the University of Saskatchewan College of Law in 2014 and 2015. Kim Pate is widely credited as the driving force behind the Inquiry into Certain Events at the Prison for Women in Kingston, headed by Justice Louise Arbour. During the Inquiry, she supported women as they aired their experiences and was a critical resource and witness in the Inquiry itself. Senator Pate is a member of the Order of Canada, a recipient of the Governor General’s Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case, the Canadian Bar Association’s Bertha Wilson Touchstone Award, and six honourary doctorates (Law Society of Upper Canada, University of Ottawa, Carleton University, St. Thomas University, Wilfred Laurier University, and Nipissing University). 

     


    Despite a constitutionally enshrined Charter of Rights and Freedoms and priding ourselves on a stellar human rights record internationally, Canada has often followed the United States when it comes to criminal and penal legislation and policy. During the past decade, efforts to decolonize, decriminalize and decarcerate have paradoxically resulted in exponential increases in the criminalization and imprisonment of Indigenous Peoples, particularly Indigenous women. In this session, Senator of Canada Kim Pate presents a critical perspective on approaches to criminal and penal (in)justice, and their implications for equality and fairness in Canada and beyond. She also shares her experience with alternatives to incarceration, for and with Indigenous, poor, and otherwise marginalized women and youth. Seminar participants are encouraged to review and discuss these reports:

     

    Human Rights of Federally Sentenced Persons

     

    Senators Go to Jail: When, why and what did they find?

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  • 2022 Nov 14

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

     

    Land, History and Indigenous Presence: Learning Through Art and Story
    Susan Dion, York University

    Susan Dion is a Potawatomi-Lenape scholar with mixed Irish and Québécois

    ancestry. She has been working in the field of Indigenous education for more than thirty years. Professor in the Faculty of Education at York University, she is currently serving as the inaugural Associate Vice President of Indigenous Initiatives. Her research focuses on Indigenizing, Decolonizing and Realizing Indigenous Education, Urban Indigenous Education and Settler – Indigenous Relationships. Dion is widely consulted by diverse community groups, workplaces, and institutions on developing methods for building more equitable, respectful relationships between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous people.


    Drawing on her knowledge and understanding of the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada in this talk Dr. Susan Dion identifies and examines a shift in Canadians desire to learn from Indigenous peoples’ experiences and perspectives. Inspired by the oft-quoted words of Metis leader Louis Reil “My people will sleep for 100 years and when they do it is the artist who will awaken their spirits” Dion utilizes the work of contemporary Indigenous artists sharing images that inspire engagement, provoke questions, and initiate learning.

     

    Lunch will be provided
    Please register by Friday, November 11
    Register here for in-person attendance

    For online attendance, register here for the Zoom link


  • 2022 Oct 31

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    In Conversation with the Honourable Rosalie Silberman Abella

    Rosalie Silberman Abella is a renowned jurist with a 50-year career in constitutional law and human rights, who served as Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada from 2004-2021. Her work in the 1984 Royal Commission on Equality in Empowerment pioneered theories of equality and discrimination that were adopted by Supreme Court of Canada, and later by the governments of New Zealand, Northern Ireland, and South Africa. Her publications include “Law, Literature and Identity: Seeking Equality.” Saskatchewan Law Review (2000): 1–2, and “The Judicial Role in a Democratic State.” Queen’s Law Journal (2001): 573–593. Ms. Abella is currently the Samuel and Judith Pisar Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

     

    Please register here to attend this event
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  • 2022 Oct 06

    Special Event

    Thu - Fri, Oct 6 to Oct 7, 5:00pm - 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Harvard Divinity School


    Thursday, October 6
    5 pm
    The Impact of God is Red on Native American Rights and Native American Religions

    Suzan Harjo (Cheyenne & Hodulgee Muscogee), The Morning Star Institute, in conversation with
    Phil Deloria, Harvard University
    Convener: Joseph P. Gone (Aaniiih Gros Ventre ), Harvard University
    Panel Discussion: 
    Robert Warrior (Osage), University of Kansas
    Michael McNally, Carleton College
    Susan Hill (Mohawk), University of Toronto
    Daniel Wildcat (Yuchi/Muscogee), Haskell Indian Nations University

    Friday, October 7
    8:30 am

    Continental Breakfast

    9:00-10:30 The Impact of God is Red on Theology
    Speaker: Robert Warrior (Osage), University of Kansas
    Convener: Ann Braude, Harvard Divinity School
    Respondent: Michelle Sanchez, Harvard Divinity School

    11:00-12:30 The Impact of God is Red on Religious Studies
    Speaker: Michael McNally, Carleton College
    Convener: Megan Minoka Hill (Oneida Nation WI), Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development
    Respondents:
    Anthony Trujillo (Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo), PhD candidate, Harvard University
    Anca Wilkening, PhD candidate, Harvard University

    12:30-1:30 Lunch

    1:30-3:00 The Impact of God is Red on Studies of Religion, Land and the Environment
    Speaker: Susan Hill (Mohawk), University of Toronto
    Convener: Kimberley Patton, Harvard University
    Respondent: Zoe Todd (Métis/otipemisiw ), Carleton University

    3:30-5:30 The Impact of God is Red in the Future
    Speaker: Dan Wildcat, (Yuchi/Muscogee), Haskell Indian Nations University
    Convener: Kelli Mosteller (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), Harvard University Native American Program
    Respondents: Panel of students and young scholars

    How does Vine Deloria, Jr.’s landmark text speak to the fields of religious studies, Native American studies, theology,
    and environmental studies in the 21st century?

    Cosponsored by the WCFIA Canada Program

    Please register by Friday, September 30
    Register for in-person participation here
    For online participation, register for the Zoom link here
    Questions? Please contact girsymposium22@gmail.com

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  • 2022 Oct 03

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    Room K262 (Bowie Vernon Room), 2nd Floor, WCFIA, Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge


    Reversing the School-to-Prison Pipeline in Canadian Public Schools:
    Restorative Justice Pedagogy as Transformative Education

    Crystena Parker-Shandal, University of Waterloo

    Crystena Parker-Shandal is Associate Professor of Social Development Studies at Renison University College at the University of Waterloo, Canada. As a restorative justice practitioner and researcher, she focuses on how dialogic pedagogies facilitate inclusive spaces where all students can participate and have their voices heard. She is the co-editor of Finding Refuge in Canada: Narratives of dislocation and co-founder of the Refugee Storybank of Canada. www.drparkershandal.com

     

    Classroom teachers transmit values feet-first through the roles and relations of power their students practice within daily pedagogies.  Pedagogies that do not invite students’ constructive engagement with contrasting viewpoints, and attend to all students’ articulated concerns, reinforce social exclusion of those whose perspectives are unheard.  Like punitive discipline that disproportionately harms racially marginalized students, exclusionary pedagogies legitimize marginalization and push some young people out into the “school-to-prison pipeline”[1].  Feasible alternatives exist.  Restorative justice peace circles, inspired and informed by the problem-solving dialogue practices of Indigenous peoples, are a pedagogical tool to empower, include, and attend to all students’ voices—to pull them in rather than push them out, building just, peaceful relations through dialogue.  Ethnographic research on the lived experiences of students and teachers in urban Canadian elementary schools demonstrates the potentially transformative power of constructive dialogue about conflicts embedded in ordinary curriculum subject matter through restorative justice peace circle pedagogies. The realities of the school-to-prison pipeline mirror the pandemic of world system inequities: it is time for a fundamental shift in how educators approach and respond to conflict.

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      Heitzeg, Nancy A. (2009). "Education or Incarceration: Zero Tolerance Policies and the School to Prison Pipeline" (PDF). Forum on Public Policy Online (2). ERIC EJ870076. 
     Schiff, Mara (April 6, 2018). "Can restorative justice disrupt the 'school-to-prison pipeline?'" Contemporary Justice Review 21 (2): 121-139. doi:10.1080/10282580.2018.1455509. S2CID 150107321.
     

  • 2022 Apr 25

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is an online Zoom Meeting. Please use link below to register.

    Shapeshifting Sovereignty: Rights, Borders, Territory

    Speaker: Ayelet Shachar, Professor of Law, Political Science, and Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Chair: Vincent Chiao, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies

    This is a Zoom event, please register at this link:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApfu-hrjMvG9IP8wITdxJ7VUBTrqrRj3AL

    Ayelet Shachar (FRSC) is Professor of Law, Political Science, and Global Affairs, and the R.F. Harney Chair and Director of Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies at the University of Toronto. Previously, she was a Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society—one of the foremost research organizations in the world—and Director at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity. Before her recruitment to the Max Planck Society, she held the Canada Research Chair in Citizenship and Multiculturalism. She is also affiliated with Goethe University Frankfurt, where she is the leader of the “Transformations of Citizenship” research group. 
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  • 2022 Mar 28

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a zoom Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    Making “A Waterfront for the World”:
    Racial Capitalism, Indigeneity, and the Marketing of Zibi in Canada’s Capital


    Speaker: Heather Dorries, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning and the Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto

    Chair: Katie Mazer, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Canada Program, Harvard University

    This is an online Zoom Webinar, please register here:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1UZ9FgneS1SKWnf6krA74g

    Heather Dorries is of Anishinaabe and settler ancestry and a member of Sagkeeng First Nation in Treaty 1. She is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed to the Department of Geography and Planning and Centre for Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban planning and settler colonialism and examines how Indigenous intellectual traditions—including Indigenous environmental knowledge, legal orders, and cultural production—can serve as the foundation for justice-oriented approaches to planning.

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  • 2022 Feb 28

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Location: 

    This is a Zoom Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    “We Don’t Have Those American Problems”: Anti-Blackness, Exclusion, and the History of Canadian Rap Music

    Francesca D’Amico-Cuthbert, post-doctoral fellow, Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto

    Chair: Marlene Gaynair, William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow, Canada Program, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University

    Please register for this event, here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_doDVvQ7eSby_6o_rnnSwXw

    Francesca D'Amico-Cuthbert (Ph.D., York University) is a post-doctoral fellow at the Jackman Humanities Institute (University of Toronto) and a researcher for the Universal Hip Hop Museum (set to open in 2024 in the Bronx, New York City). Dr. D’Amico-Cuthbert’s research explores the history of American and Canadian Black popular music, the creative industries, and histories of anti-Blackness in the music marketplace. Her current postdoctoral research maps a social history of power relations between Canadian Hip Hop practitioners, creative marketplace elites, and state-actors in an attempt to historicize Canadian Rap music’s relationship to commerce, anti-Black market segmentation and the availability of state revenue streams and marketplace exposure. Her forthcoming book project, a history of American Hip Hop knowledge production in the era of mass incarceration, outlines how Black rappers constructed complex ethnographies of urban spaces, transformed dispositions of power, and unmasked the modes and mechanisms of a persistent and haunting coloniality in the afterlives of American slavery. 

    Dr. D’Amico-Cuthbert is the winner of the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association’s Best Article Prize (2015) for her piece titled “The Mic Is My Piece:’ Canadian Rap, the Gendered ‘Cool Pose’ and Music Industry Racialization and Regulation” – the first article authored by a historian on the history of Canadian Hip Hop and Rap music. In addition to publishing her research in several edited volumes, the Canadian Journal of History, and the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, her work has also been featured in the first compilation on Hip Hop education pedagogy, #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education, Volume 1: Hip-hop as Education, Philosophy and Practice (edited by Christopher Emdin and Edmund S. Adjapong, 2018). She currently serves on the program committee for the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Canada’s Working in Music Conference, and as a researcher for Fresh, Bold and So Def (a Hip Hop feminist intervention project) and the Hip Hop Education Center, a think-tank focussed on Hip Hop education, pedagogy, and approaches to social change. 

  • 2021 Nov 15

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    Digital Platforms, Innovation and Opportunity: What Future for Canada’s Cities? 

    Shauna Brail, Associate Professor, the Institute for Management & Innovation, University of Toronto Mississauga

    The global growth and influence of digital platform firms (eg: Amazon, Alphabet, Shopify, Uber), and their impact on urban life, have prompted important shifts and challenges in 21st century cities. In Canada, cities are understood to be the engines of the nation’s economy as the places where people, jobs and investment concentrate. Yet, Canadian cities face challenges connected to their role within the global economy, which include spillover impacts related to the cost of housing and the way people and goods move around the city. This seminar will address questions about the Canadian urban experience with particular attention paid to the role of technology and innovation. Examples will be drawn from case studies on ride-hailing, Sidewalk Labs’ entry and exit from Toronto, and the future prospects for Canada’s cities as places of economic and social opportunity - given the rise of global digital platforms.  

    This is a Zoom Webinar event, please register here: 

    https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIrd-uhqzsrEt3SkqnRiBAEn8XMeJA4GF3c

    Shauna Brail is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Management & Innovation, University of Toronto. As an economic geographer and urban planner, her research focuses on the transformation of cities as a result of economic, social, and cultural change. Brail’s research encompasses studies of broad urban economic challenges and transformations associated with 21st century cities – including the impacts of COVID-19 on cities; the relationship between cities and the digital platform economy, with a particular emphasis on ride-hailing; and shifts in urban governance, policy and planning in connection to innovation and technological change. She is the Co-Principal Investigator of a five-year insight grant funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada – Taking Canada for a Ride: Digital Ride-Hailing and Its Impact on Canadian Cities. Brail is a Senior Associate at the Innovation Policy Lab in the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and a faculty affiliate at the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute. 

     

     

  • 2021 Nov 01

    Canada Seminar

    12:00pm to 2:00pm

    Location: 

    This is a Webinar. Please see below for the registration link.

    Free Expression and the Regulation of Online Content in the Canadian Context

    Michael Geist, law professor at the University of Ottawa, and Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law

    The Canadian government has embarked on a major Internet regulation initiative that includes new broadcast rules, policies to counter online harms, and mandated support for the news sector. This talk will examine the latest proposals and assess their implications for freedom of expression in Canada.

    This is a Zoom Webinar event, please register here:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_eVuSAe0fReOTSB1URfunLw

    Dr. Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law and is a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society. He regularly appears in the Globe and Mail, is the editor of several monthly technology law publications, and the author of a popular blog on Internet and intellectual property law issues. Dr. Geist serves on many boards, including Ingenium, Internet Archive Canada, and the EFF Advisory Board. He was appointed to the Order of Ontario in 2018 and has received numerous awards for his work including the Kroeger Award for Policy Leadership and the Public Knowledge IP3 Award in 2010, the Les Fowlie Award for Intellectual Freedom from the Ontario Library Association in 2009, the EFF’s Pioneer Award in 2008, and Canarie’s IWAY Public Leadership Award for his contribution to the development of the Internet in Canada. 

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